proemial

proem

[proh-em]
noun
an introductory discourse; introduction; preface; preamble.

Origin:
1350–1400; < Latin prooemium < Greek prooímion prelude (pro- pro-2 + oím(ē) song + -ion diminutive suffix); replacing Middle English proheme < Middle French < Latin, as above

proemial [proh-ee-mee-uhl, -em-ee-] , adjective
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World English Dictionary
proem (ˈprəʊɛm)
 
n
an introduction or preface, such as to a work of literature
 
[C14: from Latin prooemium introduction, from Greek prooimion, from pro-² + hoimē song]
 
proemial
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

proem
late 14c., proheme "brief introduction, prelude," from O.Fr. proheme (14c.), from L. prooemium, from Gk. prooimion "prelude," from pro- "before" + oimos "way" or oime "song."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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