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profligate

[prof-li-git, -geyt] /ˈprɒf lɪ gɪt, -ˌgeɪt/
adjective
1.
utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute.
2.
recklessly prodigal or extravagant.
noun
3.
a profligate person.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin prōflīgātus broken down in character, degraded, orig. past participle of prōflīgāre to shatter, debase, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + -flīgāre, derivative of flīgere to strike; see inflict, -ate1
Related forms
profligately, adverb
profligateness, noun
Synonyms
1. abandoned, licentious.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for prof-ligate

profligate

/ˈprɒflɪɡɪt/
adjective
1.
shamelessly immoral or debauched
2.
wildly extravagant or wasteful
noun
3.
a profligate person
Derived Forms
profligacy (ˈprɒflɪɡəsɪ) noun
profligately, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin prōflīgātus corrupt, from prōflīgāre to overthrow, from pro-1 + flīgere to beat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for prof-ligate

profligate

adj.

1520s, "overthrown, routed" (now obsolete in this sense), from Latin profligatus "destroyed, ruined, corrupt, abandoned, dissolute," past participle of profligare "to cast down, defeat, ruin," from pro- "down, forth" (see pro-) + fligere "to strike" (see afflict). Main modern meaning "recklessly extravagant" is 1779, via notion of "ruined by vice" (1640s, implied in a use of profligation). Related: Profligately. As a noun from 1709.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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