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professed

[pruh-fest] /prəˈfɛst/
adjective
1.
avowed; acknowledged.
2.
professing to be qualified; professional, rather than amateur.
3.
having taken the vows of, or been received into, a religious order.
4.
alleged; pretended.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English (in religious sense) < Medieval Latin profess(us) (special use of Latin professus, past participle of profitērī to declare publicly, equivalent to pro- pro-1 + -fet-, combining form of fatērī to acknowledge + -tus past participle suffix, with tt > ss) + -ed2
Related forms
half-professed, adjective
nonprofessed, adjective
self-professed, adjective
unprofessed, adjective

profess

[pruh-fes] /prəˈfɛs/
verb (used with object)
1.
to lay claim to, often insincerely; pretend to:
He professed extreme regret.
2.
to declare openly; announce or affirm; avow or acknowledge:
to profess one's satisfaction.
3.
to affirm faith in or allegiance to (a religion, God, etc.).
4.
to declare oneself skilled or expert in; claim to have knowledge of; make (a thing) one's profession or business.
5.
to teach as a professor:
She professes comparative literature.
6.
to receive or admit into a religious order.
verb (used without object)
7.
to make a profession, avowal, or declaration.
8.
to take the vows of a religious order.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English; back formation from professed
Related forms
preprofess, verb (used with object)
unprofessing, adjective
Synonyms
1. claim, allege, purport, avow.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for professed
  • At the end of this self-inflicted gavage, he could barely breathe or walk, though he professed to have enjoyed it.
  • Curiously, many who took part in the duel professed to disdain it.
  • Actual nonprofit work is undertaken by a relatively limited number of people who have a professed political investment in it.
  • Also, many past successful candidates have either married one of our colleagues or professed a blood relationship to one of them.
  • Even people with professed religious faith in a rosy afterlife seem to know this when the crunch comes.
  • But, in both cases, the fundamental moral problem is not the inconsistency between private actions and professed beliefs.
  • The crewman professed that he carried one of those pilots out of his aircraft because he was so shaken up by what occurred.
  • One definition of extremism is the refusal to acknowledge the challenges faced by your own professed philosophy.
  • Although the two professed an extraordinary affinity, the relationship was never easy.
  • In fact, he says, actual churchgoing may be at little more than half the professed rate.
British Dictionary definitions for professed

professed

/prəˈfɛst/
adjective (prenominal)
1.
avowed or acknowledged
2.
alleged or pretended
3.
professing to be qualified as: a professed philosopher
4.
having taken vows of a religious order
Derived Forms
professedly (prəˈfɛsɪdlɪ) adverb

profess

/prəˈfɛs/
verb
1.
to affirm or announce (something, such as faith); acknowledge: to profess ignorance, to profess a belief in God
2.
(transitive) to claim (something, such as a feeling or skill, or to be or do something), often insincerely or falsely: to profess to be a skilled driver
3.
to receive or be received into a religious order, as by taking vows
Word Origin
C14: from Latin prōfitērī to confess openly, from pro-1 + fatērī to confess
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for professed
adj.

"openly declared," 1560s, past participle adjective from profess. Earlier in a more specific sense of "having taken vows of a religious order" (late 14c.). Related: Professedly.

profess

v.

early 14c., "to take a vow" (in a religious order), a back-formation from profession or else from Old French profes, from Medieval Latin professus "avowed," literally "having declared publicly," past participle of Latin profiteri "declare openly, testify voluntarily, acknowledge, make public statement of," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + fateri (past participle fassus) "acknowledge, confess," akin to fari "speak" (see fame (n.)). Meaning "declare openly" first recorded 1520s, "a direct borrowing of the sense from Latin" [Barnhart]. Related: Professed; professing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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