profuse in

profuse

[pruh-fyoos]
adjective
1.
spending or giving freely and in large amount, often to excess; extravagant (often followed by in ): profuse praise.
2.
made or done freely and abundantly: profuse apologies.
3.
abundant; in great amount.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin profūsus, past participle of profundere to pour out or forth. See pro-1, fuse2

profusely, adverb
profuseness, noun
unprofuse, adjective
unprofusely, adverb
unprofuseness, noun


1. See lavish. 3. See ample.


1. thrifty.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
profuse (prəˈfjuːs)
 
adj
1.  plentiful, copious, or abundant: profuse compliments
2.  (often foll by in) free or generous in the giving (of): profuse in thanks
 
[C15: from Latin profundere to pour lavishly]
 
pro'fusely
 
adv
 
pro'fuseness
 
n
 
pro'fusion
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

profuse
early 15c., from L. profusus "spread out, lavish, extravagant," lit. "poured forth," prop. pp. of profundere "pour forth," from pro- "forth" + fundere "to pour" (see found (2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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