progress

[n. prog-res, -ruhs or, esp. British, proh-gres; v. pruh-gres]
noun
1.
a movement toward a goal or to a further or higher stage: the progress of a student toward a degree.
2.
developmental activity in science, technology, etc., especially with reference to the commercial opportunities created thereby or to the promotion of the material well-being of the public through the goods, techniques, or facilities created.
3.
advancement in general.
4.
growth or development; continuous improvement: He shows progress in his muscular coordination.
5.
the development of an individual or society in a direction considered more beneficial than and superior to the previous level.
6.
Biology. increasing differentiation and perfection in the course of ontogeny or phylogeny.
7.
forward or onward movement: the progress of the planets.
8.
the forward course of action, events, time, etc.
9.
an official journey or tour, as by a sovereign or dignitary.
verb (used without object), progress.
10.
to go forward or onward in space or time: The wagon train progressed through the valley. As the play progressed, the leading man grew more inaudible.
11.
to grow or develop, as in complexity, scope, or severity; advance: Are you progressing in your piano studies? The disease progressed slowly.
Idioms
12.
in progress, going on; under way; being done; happening: The meeting was already in progress.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English progresse (noun) < Latin prōgressus a going forward, equivalent to prōgred-, stem of prōgredī to advance (prō- pro-1 + -gredī, combining form of gradī to step; see grade) + -tus suffix of v. action

unprogressed, adjective


1. advance, progression. 4. increase; betterment. 11. proceed; develop, improve, grow, increase.


1. regression. 11. regress.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
progress
 
n
1.  movement forwards, esp towards a place or objective
2.  satisfactory development, growth, or advance: she is making progress in maths
3.  advance towards completion, maturity, or perfection: the steady onward march of progress
4.  (modifier) of or relating to progress: a progress report
5.  biology increasing complexity, adaptation, etc, during the development of an individual or evolution of a group
6.  (Brit) a stately royal journey
7.  in progress taking place; under way
 
vb
8.  (intr) to move forwards or onwards, as towards a place or objective
9.  to move towards or bring nearer to completion, maturity, or perfection
 
[C15: from Latin prōgressus a going forwards, from prōgredī to advance, from pro-1 + gradī to step]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

progress
early 15c., "a going on, action of walking forward," from O.Fr. progres, from L. progressus (see progression). Figurative sense of "growth, development, advancement to higher stages" is from c.1600. The verb is attested from c.1590 in the lit. sense, c.1600 in the fig. sense.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The artwork will be completed over the course of the week, so be sure to keep
  checking back in to see how it progresses.
Insulin regulation becomes tougher as the pregnancy progresses, and you may
  find yourself needing to adjust your carb intake.
The work progresses, and the structure rises, but it does not show above water
  at all.
As civilization progresses, the individual begins to define himself more
  sharply against the background of his group.
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