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prolong

[pruh-lawng, -long] /prəˈlɔŋ, -ˈlɒŋ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to lengthen out in time; extend the duration of; cause to continue longer:
to prolong one's stay abroad.
2.
to make longer in spatial extent:
to prolong a line.
Origin of prolong
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English prolongen < Late Latin prōlongāre to lengthen, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + long(us) long1 + -ā- theme vowel + -re infinitive ending
Related forms
prolongable, adjective
prolongableness, noun
prolongably, adverb
prolonger, noun
prolongment, noun
unprolongable, adjective
unprolonged, adjective
well-prolonged, adjective
Synonyms
1. See lengthen.
Antonyms
1. abbreviate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for prolonged
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It had not been the result of sudden calamity or of prolonged suffering.

    Post Haste R.M. Ballantyne
  • The reading of the letter was greeted with prolonged applause.

    The Grand Old Man Richard B. Cook
  • It did not turn out to be so prolonged or so fierce a conflict as he had apprehended.

  • Each one of his words lulled and prolonged the reverie of Angelique.

    The Dream Emile Zola
  • The courtship is sometimes a prolonged affair, and many males and females congregate at an appointed place.

British Dictionary definitions for prolonged

prolong

/prəˈlɒŋ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to lengthen in duration or space; extend
Derived Forms
prolongation (ˌprəʊlɒŋˈɡeɪʃən) noun
prolonger, noun
prolongment, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Late Latin prōlongāre to extend, from Latin pro-1 + longus long
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for prolonged

prolong

v.

early 15c., back-formation from prolongation or else from Old French prolonguer, porloignier (13c.), from Late Latin prolongare "to prolong, extend," from Latin pro- "forth" (see pro-) + longus "long" (adj.); see long (adj.). Related: Prolonged; prolonging; prolongable.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
17
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