pronoun

[proh-noun]
noun Grammar.
any member of a small class of words found in many languages that are used as replacements or substitutes for nouns and noun phrases, and that have very general reference, as I, you, he, this, who, what. Pronouns are sometimes formally distinguished from nouns, as in English by the existence of special objective forms, as him for he or me for I, and by nonoccurrence with an article or adjective.

Origin:
1520–30; < Middle French pronom < Latin prōnōmen (stem prōnōmin-). See pro-1, noun

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World English Dictionary
pronoun (ˈprəʊˌnaʊn)
 
n
pron one of a class of words that serves to replace a noun phrase that has already been or is about to be mentioned in the sentence or context
 
[C16: from Latin prōnōmen, from pro-1 + nōmen noun]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pronoun
1530, from pro- and noun; modeled on M.Fr. pronom, from L. pronomen, from pro- "in place of" + nomen "name, noun." A loan-translation of Gk. antonymia. Adj. pronomial is recorded from 1644.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

pronoun definition


A word that takes the place of a noun. She, herself, it, and this are examples of pronouns. If we substituted pronouns for the nouns in the sentence “Please give the present to Karen,” it would read “Please give it to her.”

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
But in you guys, it takes on the guise of a pronoun.
Even a campaign to replace the polite pronoun bombed.
In this case, the object pronoun in the idiom entry is someone: give someone a rain check.
Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.
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