proscription

[proh-skrip-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of proscribing.
2.
the state of being proscribed.
3.
outlawry, interdiction, or prohibition.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English proscripcioun < Latin prōscrīptiōn- (stem of prōscrīptiō) public notice of confiscation or outlawry, equivalent to prōscrīpt(us) (past participle of prōscrībere to proscribe) + -iōn- -ion

proscriptive [proh-skrip-tiv] , adjective
proscriptively, adverb
nonproscription, noun
nonproscriptive, adjective
nonproscriptively, adverb
unproscriptive, adjective
unproscriptively, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
proscription (prəʊˈskrɪpʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of proscribing or the state of being proscribed
2.  denunciation, prohibition, or exclusion
3.  outlawry or ostracism
 
[C14: from Latin prōscriptiō; see proscribe]
 
proscriptive
 
adj
 
proscriptively
 
adv
 
proscriptiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Example sentences
Decisions at the local level depend on a number of factors, and this study is
  not designed to be proscriptive.
Up until this point, all anti-evolution tactics have been proscriptive.
None of these systems of inquiries, however, is proscriptive in the realization
  of purposeful planned change.
No, laws are generally proscriptive unless they or the courts specify otherwise.
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