proselike

prose

[prohz]
noun
1.
the ordinary form of spoken or written language, without metrical structure, as distinguished from poetry or verse.
2.
matter-of-fact, commonplace, or dull expression, quality, discourse, etc.
3.
Liturgy. a hymn sung after the gradual, originating from a practice of setting words to the jubilatio of the alleluia.
adjective
4.
of, in, or pertaining to prose.
5.
commonplace; dull; prosaic.
verb (used with object), prosed, prosing.
6.
to turn into or express in prose.
verb (used without object), prosed, prosing.
7.
to write or talk in a dull, matter-of-fact manner.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Middle French < Latin prōsa (ōrātiō) literally, straightforward (speech), feminine of prōsus, for prōrsus, contraction of prōversus, past participle of prōvertere to turn forward, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + vertere to turn

proselike, adjective
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World English Dictionary
prose (prəʊz)
 
n
1.  spoken or written language as in ordinary usage, distinguished from poetry by its lack of a marked metrical structure
2.  a passage set for translation into a foreign language
3.  commonplace or dull discourse, expression, etc
4.  RC Church a hymn recited or sung after the gradual at Mass
5.  (modifier) written in prose
6.  (modifier) matter-of-fact
 
vb
7.  to write or say (something) in prose
8.  (intr) to speak or write in a tedious style
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin phrase prōsa ōrātiō straightforward speech, from prorsus prosaic, from prōvertere to turn forwards, from pro-1 + vertere to turn]
 
'proselike
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prose
early 14c., from O.Fr. prose (13c.), from L. prosa oratio "straightforward or direct speech" (without the ornaments of verse), from prosa, fem. of prosus, earlier prorsus "straightforward, direct," from Old L. provorsus "(moving) straight ahead," from pro- "forward" + vorsus "turned," pp. of vertere
"to turn" (see verse).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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