prospective

[pruh-spek-tiv]
adjective
1.
of or in the future: prospective earnings.
2.
potential, likely, or expected: a prospective partner.

Origin:
1580–90; < Late Latin prōspectīvus. See prospectus, -ive

prospectively, adverb
prospectiveness, noun

perspective, prospective.
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World English Dictionary
prospective (prəˈspɛktɪv)
 
adj
1.  looking towards the future
2.  (prenominal) anticipated or likely
 
pro'spectively
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prospective
1580s, from obsolete Fr. prospectif, from M.L. prospectivus, from L. prospect-, pp. stem of prospicere (see prospect (n.)). In 17c. also as a noun, "spy glass, telescope."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Twitter is going to sell a bill of goods to a prospective buyer, convince this
  big company of its potential value.
Notice to quit had already been served on them, when the employer decided to
  give in, frightened by the prospective loss of rent.
The meditator between the spiritual and the actual world should have a great
  prospective prudence.
The seaside location is inviting to prospective students.
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