provision

[pruh-vizh-uhn]
noun
1.
a clause in a legal instrument, a law, etc., providing for a particular matter; stipulation; proviso.
2.
the providing or supplying of something, especially of food or other necessities.
3.
arrangement or preparation beforehand, as for the doing of something, the meeting of needs, the supplying of means, etc.
4.
something provided; a measure or other means for meeting a need.
5.
a supply or stock of something provided.
6.
provisions, supplies of food.
7.
Ecclesiastical.
a.
an appointment to an ecclesiastical office.
b.
appointment by the pope to a see or benefice not yet vacant.
verb (used with object)
8.
to supply with provisions.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Latin prōvīsiōn- (stem of prōvīsiō) a foreseeing, equivalent to prōvīs(us) (past participle of prōvidēre to provide) + -iōn- -ion

provisioner, noun
provisionless, adjective
overprovision, noun
preprovision, noun
reprovision, verb
self-provision, noun
unprovisioned, adjective


1. condition. 2. catering, purveying. 6. store, provender, stock. See food.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
provision (prəˈvɪʒən)
 
n
1.  the act of supplying or providing food, etc
2.  something that is supplied or provided
3.  preparations made beforehand (esp in the phrase make provision for)
4.  (plural) food and other necessities, esp for an expedition
5.  (plural) food obtained for a household
6.  a demand, condition, or stipulation formally incorporated in a document; proviso
7.  the conferring of and induction into ecclesiastical offices
 
vb
8.  (tr) to supply with provisions
 
[C14: from Latin prōvīsiō a providing; see provide]
 
pro'visioner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

provision
late 14c., "providing beforehand" (originally in ref. to ecclesiastical appointments made before the position was vacant), from O.Fr. provision (early 14c.), from L. provisionem (nom. provisio) "foresight, preparation," from providere "look ahead" (see provide). Meaning
"something provided" is attested from late 15c.; specific sense of "supply of food" is from c.1600. The verb is attested from 1805 (implied in provisioned).

provisions
"supply of food," c.1600; see provision.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They settled there, but around a fourth of the tribe died on the way, because
  they had no provisions over the winter.
Tribal communities, after all, have long made provisions for strangers.
It's practically impossible for a human nowadays to go live in the wild without
  any tools or provisions.
Certain outmoded provisions need to be revised so that businesses can raise
  capital more easily and efficiently.
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