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puddle

[puhd-l] /ˈpʌd l/
noun
1.
a small pool of water, as of rainwater on the ground.
2.
a small pool of any liquid.
3.
clay or the like mixed with water and tempered, used as a waterproof lining for the walls of canals, ditches, etc.
verb (used with object), puddled, puddling.
4.
to mark or scatter with puddles.
5.
to wet with dirty water, mud, etc.
6.
to make (water) muddy or dirty.
7.
to muddle or confuse.
8.
to make (clay or the like) into puddle.
9.
to cover with pasty clay or puddle.
10.
Metallurgy. to subject (molten iron) to the process of puddling.
11.
to destroy the granular structure of (soil) by agricultural operations on it when it is too wet.
12.
Horticulture. to dip the roots of (a tree, shrub, etc.) into a thin mixture of loam and water to retard drying out during transplanting.
verb (used without object), puddled, puddling.
13.
to wade in a puddle:
The children were puddling.
14.
to be or become puddled:
The backyard was puddling.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; (noun) Middle English puddel, podel, pothel, apparently diminutive of Old English pudd ditch, furrow (akin to Low German pudel puddle); (v.) late Middle English pothelen, derivative of the noun
Related forms
puddler, noun
puddly, adjective
unpuddled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for puddle
  • The torn shoes which she had on her stockingless feet were as wet as if they had been standing in a puddle all night.
  • On the other hand, you're likely to tread on ripe figs when they drop onto the ground and melt into a puddle of sticky syrup.
  • One place they get it from is mud, so give them a permanent puddle.
  • Toby walked around, giving the couple a wide berth as if they were a puddle.
  • He pushes her and slips in a puddle of water, dying.
  • By the time it arrived on my doorstep it was a puddle.
  • Now the lake is a shrunken puddle of its former self.
  • Reflections were always available to be viewed on the side of shiny objects or in the water puddle when drinking.
  • He is the one floating a small paper boat in a cold puddle in the street.
  • Her small body was curled awkwardly, her right cheek resting on the cold cement in a puddle of blood.
British Dictionary definitions for puddle

puddle

/ˈpʌdəl/
noun
1.
a small pool of water, esp of rain
2.
a small pool of any liquid
3.
a worked mixture of wet clay and sand that is impervious to water and is used to line a pond or canal
4.
(rowing) the patch of eddying water left by the blade of an oar after completion of a stroke
verb
5.
(transitive) to make (clay, etc) into puddle
6.
(transitive) to subject (iron) to puddling
7.
(intransitive) to dabble or wade in puddles, mud, or shallow water
8.
(intransitive) to mess about
Derived Forms
puddler, noun
puddly, adjective
Word Origin
C14 podel, diminutive of Old English pudd ditch, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for puddle
n.

early 14c., "small pool of dirty water," frequentative or diminutive of Old English pudd "ditch," related to German pudeln "to splash in water" (cf. poodle). Originally used of pools and ponds as well.

v.

"to dabble in water, poke in mud," mid-15c., from puddle (n.); extended sense in iron manufacture is "turn and stir (molten iron) in a furnace." Related: Puddled; puddling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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