purifier

purify

[pyoor-uh-fahy]
verb (used with object), purified, purifying.
1.
to make pure; free from anything that debases, pollutes, adulterates, or contaminates: to purify metals.
2.
to free from foreign, extraneous, or objectionable elements: to purify a language.
3.
to free from guilt or evil.
4.
to clear or purge (usually followed by of or from ).
5.
to make clean for ceremonial or ritual use.
verb (used without object), purified, purifying.
6.
to become pure.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English purifien < Middle French purifier < Latin pūrificāre. See pure, -ify

purification, noun
purificatory [pyoo-rif-i-kuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
purifier, noun
nonpurification, noun
nonpurifying, adjective
repurification, noun
repurify, verb, repurified, repurifying.
self-purifying, adjective
unpurified, adjective
unpurifying, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
purifier (ˈpjʊərɪˌfaɪə)
 
n
a device or substance that frees something of extraneous, contaminating, or debasing matter

purify (ˈpjʊərɪˌfaɪ)
 
vb , -fies, -fying, -fied
1.  to free (something) of extraneous, contaminating, or debasing matter
2.  (tr) to free (a person, etc) from sin or guilt
3.  (tr) to make clean, as in a ritual, esp the churching of women after childbirth
 
[C14: from Old French purifier, from Late Latin pūrificāre to cleanse, from pūrus pure + facere to make]
 
purifi'cation
 
n
 
purificatory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

purify
c.1300, "free from spiritual pollution," from O.Fr. purifier (12c.), from L. purificare "to make pure," from purus "pure" (see pure) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Meaning "free from extraneous matter" is recorded from c.1440.
Purification first attested c.1380; in ref. to Feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary, from 1389.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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