follow Dictionary.com

Today's Word of the Day means...

purify

[pyoo r-uh-fahy] /ˈpyʊər əˌfaɪ/
verb (used with object), purified, purifying.
1.
to make pure; free from anything that debases, pollutes, adulterates, or contaminates:
to purify metals.
2.
to free from foreign, extraneous, or objectionable elements:
to purify a language.
3.
to free from guilt or evil.
4.
to clear or purge (usually followed by of or from).
5.
to make clean for ceremonial or ritual use.
verb (used without object), purified, purifying.
6.
to become pure.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English purifien < Middle French purifier < Latin pūrificāre. See pure, -ify
Related forms
purification, noun
purificatory
[pyoo-rif-i-kuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /pyʊˈrɪf ɪ kəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
purifier, noun
nonpurification, noun
nonpurifying, adjective
repurification, noun
repurify, verb, repurified, repurifying.
self-purifying, adjective
unpurified, adjective
unpurifying, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for purify
  • New aerogels could clean contaminated water, purify hydrogen for fuel cells.
  • The intense internal heat generated by his sort of yoga was meant to purify and cleanse the body.
  • The final stage in the process is to wash and spin the red cells to purify them.
  • It takes him about half an hour to purify a tank's worth of fuel in this way.
  • At its extreme end, this campaign to defend and purify the faith shades into intolerance, intimidation and violence.
  • The space ship uses technology that can purify water to drinking level.
  • Through evapotranspiration the atmosphere and plants help to purify water.
  • Paying for protection may be the cheapest way to both preserve and naturally purify water, without extra-and expensive-treatment.
  • Some systems purify collected rainwater for drinking.
  • The plants, fungi, and algae of a wetland filter wastes and purify water.
British Dictionary definitions for purify

purify

/ˈpjʊərɪˌfaɪ/
verb -fies, -fying, -fied
1.
to free (something) of extraneous, contaminating, or debasing matter
2.
(transitive) to free (a person, etc) from sin or guilt
3.
(transitive) to make clean, as in a ritual, esp the churching of women after childbirth
Derived Forms
purification, noun
purificatory (ˈpjʊərɪfɪˌkeɪtərɪ) adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French purifier, from Late Latin pūrificāre to cleanse, from pūrus pure + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for purify
purify
c.1300, "free from spiritual pollution," from O.Fr. purifier (12c.), from L. purificare "to make pure," from purus "pure" (see pure) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Meaning "free from extraneous matter" is recorded from c.1440. Purification first attested c.1380; in ref. to Feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary, from 1389.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
purify in Technology


A debugging tool from Pure Software.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for purify

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for purify

14
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with purify