pyran

pyran

[pahy-ran, pahy-ran]
noun Chemistry.
either of two compounds having the formula C 5 H 6 O, containing one oxygen and five carbon atoms arranged in a six-membered ring.

Origin:
1900–05; pyr(one) + -an, variant of -ane

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World English Dictionary
pyran (ˈpaɪræn, paɪˈræn)
 
n
an unsaturated heterocyclic compound having a ring containing five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom and two double bonds. It has two isomers depending on the position of the saturated carbon atom relative to the oxygen
 
[C20: from pyro- + -an]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
pyran   (pī'rān')  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Any of a class of compounds having a ring of five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom and two double bonds. The pyran ring structure forms part of many organic compounds, especially sugars.

  2. An unstable compound that is the simplest member of this class. Chemical formula: C5H6O.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

pyran

any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series in which five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom are present in a ring structure. Of two possible simple pyran compounds, only one is known; it was prepared in 1962 and found to be very unstable. Among the stable members of this family is tetrahydropyran, made by hydrogenating the dihydro compound. Sugars often occur in pyranose forms containing the tetrahydropyran ring: a typical example is the glucose unit present in sucrose, starch, cellulose, and glycogen.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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