q. song

Collins
World English Dictionary
song (sɒŋ)
 
n
1.  a.  a piece of music, usually employing a verbal text, composed for the voice, esp one intended for performance by a soloist
 b.  the whole repertory of such pieces
 c.  (as modifier): a song book
2.  poetical composition; poetry
3.  the characteristic tuneful call or sound made by certain birds or insects
4.  the act or process of singing: they raised their voices in song
5.  for a song at a bargain price
6.  informal (Brit) on song performing at peak efficiency or ability
 
[Old English sang; related to Gothic saggws, Old High German sang; see sing]
 
'songlike
 
adj

Song (sʊŋ)
 
n
the Pinyin transliteration of the Chinese name for Sung

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

song
O.E. sang "art of singing, a metrical composition adapted for singing," from P.Gmc. *sangwaz (cf. O.N. söngr, Norw. song, Swed. sång, O.S., Dan., O.Fris., O.H.G., Ger. sang, M.Du. sanc, Du. zang, Goth. saggws), related to sing (q.v.). Songbook is O.E. sangboc; song-bird
is from 1774; songster is O.E. sangystre. Phrase for a song is from "All's Well" III.ii.9. With a song in (one's) heart "feeling of joy" is first attested 1930 in Lorenz Hart's lyric. Song and dance as a form of vaudeville act is attested from 1872; fig. sense of "rigmarole" is from 1895.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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