quasi-defeated

defeat

[dih-feet]
verb (used with object)
1.
to overcome in a contest, election, battle, etc.; prevail over; vanquish: They defeated the enemy. She defeated her brother at tennis.
2.
to frustrate; thwart.
3.
to eliminate or deprive of something expected: The early returns defeated his hopes of election.
4.
Law. to annul.
noun
5.
the act of overcoming in a contest: an overwhelming defeat of all opposition.
6.
an instance of defeat; setback: He considered his defeat a personal affront.
7.
an overthrow or overturning; vanquishment: the defeat of a government.
8.
a bringing to naught; frustration: the defeat of all his hopes and dreams.
9.
the act or event of being bested; losing: Defeat is not something she abides easily.
10.
Archaic. undoing; destruction; ruin.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English defeten (v.) < Anglo-French, Old French desfait, past participle of desfaire to undo, destroy < Medieval Latin disfacere, equivalent to Latin dis- dis-1 + facere to do

defeater, noun
nondefeat, noun
predefeat, noun, verb
quasi-defeated, adjective
redefeat, verb, noun
undefeated, adjective
undefeatedly, adverb
undefeatedness, noun


1. overwhelm, overthrow, rout, check. Defeat, conquer, overcome, subdue imply gaining a victory or control over an opponent. Defeat suggests beating or frustrating: to defeat an enemy in battle. Conquer implies finally gaining control over, usually after a series of efforts or against systematic resistance: to conquer a country, one's inclinations. Overcome emphasizes surmounting difficulties in prevailing over an antagonist: to overcome opposition, bad habits. Subdue means to conquer so completely that resistance is broken: to subdue a rebellious spirit. 2. foil, baffle, balk. 7. downfall.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
defeat (dɪˈfiːt)
 
vb
1.  to overcome in a contest or competition; win a victory over
2.  to thwart or frustrate: this accident has defeated all his hopes of winning
3.  law to render null and void; annul
 
n
4.  the act of defeating or state of being defeated
5.  an instance of defeat
6.  overthrow or destruction
7.  law an annulment
 
[C14: from Old French desfait, from desfaire to undo, ruin, from des-dis-1 + faire to do, from Latin facere]
 
de'feater
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

defeat
late 14c., from Anglo-Norm. defeter, from O.Fr. defait, pp. of defaire, from V.L. *diffacere "undo, destroy," from L. dis- "un-, not" + facere "to do, perform" (see factitious). Original sense was of "bring ruination, cause destruction." Military sense of "conquer" is c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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