quasi-immediate

immediate

[ih-mee-dee-it]
adjective
1.
occurring or accomplished without delay; instant: an immediate reply.
2.
following or preceding without a lapse of time: the immediate future.
3.
having no object or space intervening; nearest or next: in the immediate vicinity.
4.
of or pertaining to the present time or moment: our immediate plans.
5.
without intervening medium or agent; direct: an immediate cause.
6.
having a direct bearing: immediate consideration.
7.
very close in relationship: my immediate family.
8.
Philosophy. directly intuited.

Origin:
1525–35; < Medieval Latin immediātus. See im-2, mediate (adj.)

immediateness, noun
quasi-immediate, adjective
quasi-immediately, adverb
unimmediate, adjective
unimmediately, adverb
unimmediateness, noun


1. instantaneous. 3. close, proximate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
immediate (ɪˈmiːdɪət)
 
adj
1.  taking place or accomplished without delay: an immediate reaction
2.  closest or most direct in effect or relationship: the immediate cause of his downfall
3.  having no intervening medium; direct in effect: an immediate influence
4.  contiguous in space, time, or relationship: our immediate neighbour
5.  present; current: the immediate problem is food
6.  philosophy of or relating to an object or concept that is directly known or intuited
7.  logic (of an inference) deriving its conclusion from a single premise, esp by conversion or obversion of a categorial statement
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin immediātus, from Latin im- (not) + mediāre to be in the middle; see mediate]
 
im'mediacy
 
n
 
im'mediateness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

immediate
early 15c., from O.Fr. immediat, from L.L. immediatus "without anything between," from in- "not" + mediatus, pp. of mediare "to halve," later, "be in the middle," from L. medius "middle" (see medial).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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