quasicommanding

commanding

[kuh-man-ding, -mahn-]
adjective
1.
being in command: a commanding officer.
2.
appreciably superior or imposing; winning; sizable: a commanding position; a commanding lead in the final period.
3.
having the air, tone, etc., of command; imposing; authoritative: a man of commanding appearance; a commanding voice.
4.
dominating by position, usually elevation; overlooking: a commanding bluff at the mouth of the river.
5.
(of a view, or prospect) provided by a commanding location and so permitting dominance: a commanding view of the mouth of the river.

Origin:
1475–85; command + -ing2

commandingly, adverb
commandingness, noun
quasi-commanding, adjective
quasi-commandingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To quasicommanding
Collins
World English Dictionary
commanding (kəˈmɑːndɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  being in command
2.  having the air of authority: a commanding voice
3.  (of a position, situation, etc) exerting control
4.  (of a height, viewpoint, etc) overlooking; advantageous
 
com'mandingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

command
c.1300, from O.Fr. comander "to order, enjoin," from V.L. *commandare, from L. commendare "to recommend" (see commend), alt. by influence of L. mandare "to commit, entrust" (see mandate). Replaced O.E. bebeodan. The noun is attested from 1550s. Commander in chief attested from 1650s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature