quasihappy

happy

[hap-ee]
adjective, happier, happiest.
1.
delighted, pleased, or glad, as over a particular thing: to be happy to see a person.
2.
characterized by or indicative of pleasure, contentment, or joy: a happy mood; a happy frame of mind.
3.
favored by fortune; fortunate or lucky: a happy, fruitful land.
4.
apt or felicitous, as actions, utterances, or ideas.
5.
obsessed by or quick to use the item indicated (usually used in combination): a trigger-happy gangster. Everybody is gadget-happy these days.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English; see hap1, -y1

overhappy, adjective
quasi-happy, adjective


1. joyous, joyful, blithe, cheerful, merry, contented, gay, blissful, satisfied. 3. favorable, propitious; successful, prosperous. See fortunate. 4. appropriate, fitting, opportune, pertinent.


1. sad.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
happy (ˈhæpɪ)
 
adj , -pier, -piest
1.  feeling, showing, or expressing joy; pleased
2.  willing: I'd be happy to show you around
3.  causing joy or gladness
4.  fortunate; lucky: the happy position of not having to work
5.  aptly expressed; appropriate: a happy turn of phrase
6.  informal (postpositive) slightly intoxicated
 
interj
7.  (in combination): happy birthday; happy Christmas
 
[C14: see hap1, -y1]
 
'happily
 
adv
 
'happiness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

happy
mid-14c., "lucky," from hap "chance, fortune" (see haphazard), sense of "very glad" first recorded late 14c. Ousted O.E. eadig (from ead "wealth, riches") and gesælig, which has become silly. O.E. bliðe "happy" survives as
blithe. From Greek to Irish, a great majority of the European words for "happy" at first meant "lucky." An exception is Welsh, where the word used first meant "wise." Used in World War II and after as a suffix (e.g. bomb-happy, flak-happy) expressing "dazed or frazzled from stress." Happy hour "early evening period of discount drinks and free hors-d'oeuvres at a bar" is first recorded 1961. Happy-go-lucky is from 1670s. Happy as a clam (1630s) was originally happy as a clam in the mud at high tide, when it can't be dug up and eaten.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

happy definition


  1. mod.
    alcohol intoxicated; tipsy. : She seems a little happy. Must have had a few already.
  2. mod.
    obsessed with something. (A combining form showing a strong interest in the thing that is named before happy.) : Pete's car-happy right now. That's all he thinks about.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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