r rush

Rush

[ruhsh]
noun
1.
Benjamin, 1745–1813, U.S. physician and political leader: author of medical treatises.
2.
his son, Richard, 1780–1859, U.S. lawyer, politician, and diplomat.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
rush1 (rʌʃ)
 
vb (when intr, often foll by at, in or into)
1.  to hurry or cause to hurry; hasten
2.  to make a sudden attack upon (a fortress, position, person, etc)
3.  to proceed or approach in a reckless manner
4.  rush one's fences to proceed with precipitate haste
5.  (intr) to come, flow, swell, etc, quickly or suddenly: tears rushed to her eyes
6.  slang to cheat, esp by grossly overcharging
7.  (US), (Canadian) (tr) to make a concerted effort to secure the agreement, participation, etc, of (a person)
8.  (intr) American football to gain ground by running forwards with the ball
 
n
9.  the act or condition of rushing
10.  a sudden surge towards someone or something: a gold rush
11.  a sudden surge of sensation, esp produced by a drug
12.  a sudden demand
 
adj
13.  requiring speed or urgency: a rush job
14.  characterized by much movement, business, etc: a rush period
 
[C14 ruschen, from Old French ruser to put to flight, from Latin recūsāre to refuse, reject]
 
'rusher1
 
n

rush2 (rʌʃ)
 
n
1.  any annual or perennial plant of the genus Juncus, growing in wet places and typically having grasslike cylindrical leaves and small green or brown flowers: family Juncaceae Many species are used to make baskets
2.  any of various similar or related plants, such as the woodrush, scouring rush, and spike-rush
3.  something valueless; a trifle; straw: not worth a rush
4.  short for rush light
 
[Old English risce, rysce; related to Middle Dutch risch, Norwegian rusk, Old Slavonic rozga twig, rod]
 
'rushlike2
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rush
c.1340 (implied in rushing), "to drive back or down," from Anglo-Fr. russher, from O.Fr. ruser "to dodge, repel" (see ruse). Meaning "to do something quickly" is from 1659; transitive sense of "to hurry up (someone or something)" is from 1850. Football sense originally was
in rugby (1857). Fraternity/sorority sense is from 1896 (originally it was what the fraternity did to the student). The noun is attested from c.1380; sense of "mass migration of people" (especially to a gold field) is from 1848, Amer.Eng. Meaning "surge of pleasure" is from 1960s. Rush hour first recorded 1890.

rush
"plant growing in marshy ground," O.E. resc, earlier risc, from P.Gmc. *rusk- (cf. M.L.G. rusch, M.H.G. rusch, W.Fris. risk). O.Fr. rusche probably is from a Gmc. source. Used for making torches and finger rings, also strewn on floors when visitors arrived; it was attested a type of "something of no
value" from c.1300.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Rush (rŭsh), Benjamin. 1745-1813.

American physician, politician, and educator. A signer of the declaration of independence, he promoted the humane treatment of the mentally ill.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Rush definition


the papyrus (Job 8:11). (See BULRUSH.) The expression "branch and rush" in Isa. 9:14; 19:15 means "utterly."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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