racketlike

racket

2 [rak-it]
noun
1.
a light bat having a netting of catgut or nylon stretched in a more or less oval frame and used for striking the ball in tennis, the shuttlecock in badminton, etc.
2.
the short-handled paddle used to strike the ball in table tennis.
3.
rackets, (used with a singular verb) racquet ( def 1 ).
4.
a snowshoe made in the form of a tennis racket.
Also, racquet (for defs 1, 2, 4).


Origin:
1490–1500; < Middle French raquette, rachette, perhaps < Arabic rāḥet, variant of rāḥah palm of the hand

racketlike, adjective
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World English Dictionary
racket1 (ˈrækɪt)
 
n
1.  a noisy disturbance or loud commotion; clamour; din
2.  gay or excited revelry, dissipation, etc
3.  an illegal enterprise carried on for profit, such as extortion, fraud, prostitution, drug peddling, etc
4.  slang a business or occupation: what's your racket?
5.  music
 a.  a medieval woodwind instrument of deep bass pitch
 b.  a reed stop on an organ of deep bass pitch
 
vb (often foll by about)
6.  rare to go about gaily or noisily, in search of pleasure, excitement, etc
 
[C16: probably of imitative origin; compare rattle1]

racket or racquet2 (ˈrækɪt)
 
n
1.  a bat consisting of an open network of nylon or other strings stretched in an oval frame with a handle, used to strike the ball in tennis, badminton, etc
2.  a snowshoe shaped like a tennis racket
 
vb
3.  (tr) to strike (a ball, shuttlecock, etc) with a racket
 
[C16: from French raquette, from Arabic rāhat palm of the hand]
 
racquet or racquet2
 
n
 
vb
 
[C16: from French raquette, from Arabic rāhat palm of the hand]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

racket
"loud noise," 1565, said to be imitative. Meaning "dishonest activity" (1785) is perhaps from racquet, via notion of "game," reinforced by rack-rent "extortionate rent" (1591), from rack (1). Racketeer (v. and n.) first recorded 1928.

racket
"bat used in tennis, etc.," see racquet.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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