raucous

[raw-kuhs]
adjective
1.
harsh; strident; grating: raucous voices; raucous laughter.
2.
rowdy; disorderly: a raucous party.

Origin:
1760–70; < Latin raucus hoarse, harsh, rough; see -ous

raucously, adverb
raucousness, raucity [raw-si-tee] , noun


1. rough, jarring, raspy.


1. soft, mellow, dulcet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To raucously
Collins
World English Dictionary
raucous (ˈrɔːkəs)
 
adj
(of voices, cries, etc) harshly or hoarsely loud
 
[C18: from Latin raucus hoarse]
 
'raucously
 
adv
 
'raucousness
 
n
 
raucity
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

raucous
1769, from L. raucus "hoarse," related to ravus "hoarse," from PIE echoic base *reu- "make hoarse cries" (cf. Skt. rayati "barks," ravati "roars;" Gk. oryesthai "to howl, roar;" L. racco "a roar;" O.C.S. rjevo "I roar;" Lith. rekti "roar;" O.E. rarian "to wail, bellow"). M.E. had rauc, in the same sense,
from the same source.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Strikingly-colored blue jays called raucously as they flew among the branches.
But his performance last night was distinctive because in between the raucously cheerful songs, his grandson was baptized.
Flocks of hopeful and appreciative gulls follow raucously behind them.
Related Searches
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature