re arose

arise

[uh-rahyz]
verb (used without object), arose, arisen [uh-riz-uhn] , arising.
1.
to get up from sitting, lying, or kneeling; rise: He arose from his chair when she entered the room.
2.
to awaken; wake up: He arose at sunrise to get an early start to the beach.
3.
to move upward; mount; ascend: A thin curl of smoke arose lazily from the cabin.
4.
to come into being, action, or notice; originate; appear; spring up: New problems arise daily.
5.
to result or proceed; spring or issue (sometimes followed by from ): It is difficult to foresee the consequences that may arise from this action. After such destruction many problems in resettlement often arise.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English arisen, Old English ārīsan; cognate with Gothic ur-reisan. See a-3, rise

rearise, verb (used without object), rearose, rearisen, rearising.


3. climb. 4. emerge, flow, emanate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
arise (əˈraɪz)
 
vb , arises, arising, arose, arisen
1.  to come into being; originate
2.  (foll by from) to spring or proceed as a consequence; result: guilt arising from my actions
3.  to get or stand up, as from a sitting, kneeling, or lying position
4.  to come into notice
5.  to move upwards; ascend
 
[Old English ārīsan; related to Old Saxon arīsan, Old High German irrīsan; see rise]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

arise
O.E. arisan (cognate with O.S. arisan, Goth. urreisan), from a- (1) "of" + rise (q.v.). Mostly replaced by rise except in ref. to circumstances.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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