Re corder

recorder

[ri-kawr-der]
noun
1.
a person who records, especially as an official duty.
2.
English Law.
a.
a judge in a city or borough court.
b.
(formerly) the legal adviser of a city or borough, with responsibility for keeping a record of legal actions and local customs.
3.
a recording or registering apparatus or device.
4.
a device for recording sound, images, or data by electrical, magnetic, or optical means.
5.
an end-blown flute having a fipple mouthpiece, eight finger holes, and a soft, mellow tone.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English recorder wind instrument (see record, -er1), recordour legal official (< Anglo-French recordour, Old French recordeour)

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
recorder (rɪˈkɔːdə)
 
n
1.  a person who records, such as an official or historian
2.  something that records, esp an apparatus that provides a permanent record of experiments, etc
3.  short for tape recorder
4.  music a wind instrument of the flute family, blown through a fipple in the mouth end, having a reedlike quality of tone. There are four usual sizes: bass, tenor, treble, and descant
5.  (in England) a barrister or solicitor of at least ten years' standing appointed to sit as a part-time judge in the crown court
 
[sense 4 probably from record (vb) in the archaic sense "to sing"]
 
re'cordership
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

recorder
"chief legal officer of a city," early 15c., from Anglo-Fr. recordour (early 14c.), O.Fr. recordeor, from M.L. recordator, from L. recordari "remember" (see record (v.)). The musical instrument is attested by this name from early 15c., from record (v.) in the obsolete sense
of "practice a tune." The name, and the thing, were rarely heard by mid-1800s, ousted by the flute, but enjoyed a revival after 1911 as an easy-to-play instrument for musical beginners.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

recorder definition


A wooden flute played like a whistle. It was popular in the fourteenth through eighteenth centuries. Interest in it has been revived over the past few decades.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Recorder definition


(Heb. mazkir, i.e., "the mentioner," "rememberancer"), the office first held by Jehoshaphat in the court of David (2 Sam. 8:16), also in the court of Solomon (1 Kings 4:3). The next recorder mentioned is Joah, in the reign of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:18, 37; Isa. 36:3, 22). In the reign of Josiah another of the name of Joah filled this office (2 Chr. 34:8). The "recorder" was the chancellor or vizier of the kingdom. He brought all weighty matters under the notice of the king, "such as complaints, petitions, and wishes of subjects or foreigners. He also drew up papers for the king's guidance, and prepared drafts of the royal will for the scribes. All treaties came under his oversight; and he had the care of the national archives or records, to which, as royal historiographer, like the same state officer in Assyria and Egypt, he added the current annals of the kingdom."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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