re-acceleration

acceleration

[ak-sel-uh-rey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of accelerating; increase of speed or velocity.
2.
a change in velocity.
3.
Mechanics. the time rate of change of velocity with respect to magnitude or direction; the derivative of velocity with respect to time.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin accelerātiōn- (stem of accelerātiō). See accelerate, -ion

nonacceleration, noun
overacceleration, noun
reacceleration, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
acceleration (ækˌsɛləˈreɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of accelerating or the state of being accelerated
2.  a the rate of increase of speed or the rate of change of velocity
3.  a the power to accelerate

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

acceleration
1530s, from L. accelerationem (nom. acceleratio) "a hastening," from accelerare (see accelerate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
acceleration  [%PREMIUM_LINK%]     (āk-sěl'ə-rā'shən)  Pronunciation Key 
The rate of change of the velocity of a moving body. An increase in the magnitude of the velocity of a moving body (an increase in speed) is called a positive acceleration; a decrease in speed is called a negative acceleration. Acceleration, like velocity, is a vector quantity, so any change in the direction of a moving body is also an acceleration. A moving body that follows a curved path, even when its speed remains constant, is undergoing acceleration. See more at gravity, relativity.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

acceleration definition


A change in the velocity of an object.

Note: The most familiar kind of acceleration is a change in the speed of an object. An object that stays at the same speed but changes direction, however, is also being accelerated. (See force.)
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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