re-dilate

dilate

[dahy-leyt, di-, dahy-leyt]
verb (used with object), dilated, dilating.
1.
to make wider or larger; cause to expand.
2.
Archaic. to describe or develop at length.
verb (used without object), dilated, dilating.
3.
to spread out; expand.
4.
to speak or write at length; expatiate (often followed by on or upon ).

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English dilaten < Middle French dilater, Latin dīlātāre to spread out, equivalent to dī- di-2 + lāt(us) broad + -āre infinitive suffix

dilatability, noun
dilatable, adjective
nondilatability, noun
nondilatable, adjective
overdilate, verb, overdilated, overdilating.
redilate, verb, redilated, redilating.
self-dilated, adjective
subdilated, adjective
undilatable, adjective
undilated, adjective
undilating, adjective

dilate, dilute.


1. See expand.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dilate (daɪˈleɪt, dɪ-)
 
vb
1.  to expand or cause to expand; make or become wider or larger: the pupil of the eye dilates in the dark
2.  (intr; often foll by on or upon) to speak or write at length; expand or enlarge
 
[C14: from Latin dīlātāre to spread out, amplify, from dis- apart + lātus wide]
 
di'latable
 
adj
 
dilata'bility
 
n
 
di'latableness
 
n
 
di'lation
 
n
 
dilatation
 
n
 
dila'tational
 
adj
 
dilative
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dilate
late 14c., from O.Fr. dilater, from L. dilatare "make wider, enlarge," from dis- "apart" + latus "wide" (see latitude). Related: Dilated.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dilate di·late (dī-lāt', dī'lāt')
v. di·lat·ed, di·lat·ing, di·lates
To make or become wider or larger.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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