re-move

remove

[ri-moov]
verb (used with object), removed, removing.
1.
to move from a place or position; take away or off: to remove the napkins from the table.
2.
to take off or shed (an article of clothing): to remove one's jacket.
3.
to move or shift to another place or position; transfer: She removed the painting to another wall.
4.
to put out; send away: to remove a tenant.
5.
to dismiss or force from a position or office; discharge: They removed him for embezzling.
6.
to take away, withdraw, or eliminate: to remove the threat of danger.
7.
to get rid of; do away with; put an end to: to remove a stain; to remove the source of disease.
8.
to kill; assassinate.
verb (used without object), removed, removing.
9.
to move from one place to another, especially to another locality or residence: We remove to Newport early in July.
10.
to go away; depart; disappear.
noun
11.
the act of removing.
12.
a removal from one place, as of residence, to another.
13.
the distance by which one person, place, or thing is separated from another: to see something at a remove.
14.
a mental distance from the reality of something as a result of psychological detachment or lack of experience: to criticize something at a remove.
15.
a degree of difference, as that due to descent, transmission, etc.: a folk survival, at many removes, of a druidic rite.
16.
a step or degree, as in a graded scale.
17.
British. a promotion of a pupil to a higher class or division at school.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English removen (v.) < Old French remouvoir < Latin removēre. See re-, move

preremove, verb (used with object), preremoved, preremoving.


1. dislodge. 3. displace, transport. 8. murder.


1. leave. 9. remain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
remove (rɪˈmuːv)
 
vb
1.  to take away and place elsewhere
2.  to displace (someone) from office; dismiss
3.  to do away with (a grievance, cause of anxiety, etc); abolish
4.  to cause (dirt, stains, or anything unwanted) to disappear; get rid of
5.  euphemistic to assassinate; kill
6.  formal (intr) to change the location of one's home or place of business: the publishers have removed to Mayfair
 
n
7.  the act of removing, esp (formal) a removal of one's residence or place of work
8.  the degree of difference separating one person, thing, or condition from another: only one remove from madness
9.  (Brit) (in certain schools) a class or form, esp one for children of about 14 years, designed to introduce them to the greater responsibilities of a more senior position in the school
10.  (at a formal dinner, formerly) a dish to be changed while the rest of the course remains on the table
 
[C14: from Old French removoir, from Latin removēre; see move]
 
re'movable
 
adj
 
remova'bility
 
n
 
re'movableness
 
n
 
re'movably
 
adv
 
re'mover
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

remove
c.1300, from O.Fr. remouvoir, from L. removere "move back or away," from re- "back, away" + movere "to move" (see move). The noun is first recorded 1553, "act of removing;" sense of "space or interval by which one thing is distant from another" is attested from 1628.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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