rebuke

[ri-byook]
verb (used with object), rebuked, rebuking.
1.
to express sharp, stern disapproval of; reprove; reprimand.
noun
2.
sharp, stern disapproval; reproof; reprimand.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English rebuken (v.) < Anglo-French rebuker (Old French rebuchier) to beat back, equivalent to re- re- + bucher to beat, strike < Germanic

rebukable, adjective
rebuker, noun
rebukingly, adverb
unrebukable, adjective
unrebuked, adjective


1. censure, upbraid, chide, admonish. See reproach. 2. reproach, remonstration, censure.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rebuke (rɪˈbjuːk)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to scold or reprimand (someone)
 
n
2.  a reprimand or scolding
 
[C14: from Old Norman French rebuker, from re- + Old French buchier to hack down, from busche log, of Germanic origin]
 
re'bukable
 
adj
 
re'buker
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rebuke
early 14c., from Anglo-Fr. rebuker "to repel, beat back," O.Fr. rebuchier, from re- "back" + buschier "to strike, chop wood," from busche (Fr. bûche) "wood," from P.Gmc. *busk- (see bush). The noun is first attested early 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He received rebukes from any one with cheerfulness and thanks.
If gestures are rebuked, the world will see those rebukes for what they are.
But it is noteworthy that there were no publicly uttered rebukes to those who hissed and groaned.
He buries the creature and gives the rose to his princess, who in the end rebukes him.
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