recalcitrancy

recalcitrant

[ri-kal-si-truhnt]
adjective
1.
resisting authority or control; not obedient or compliant; refractory.
2.
hard to deal with, manage, or operate.
noun
3.
a recalcitrant person.

Origin:
1835–45; < Latin recalcitrant- (stem of recalcitrāns, present participle of recalcitrāre to kick back), equivalent to re- re- + calcitr(āre) to strike with the heels, kick (derivative of calx heel) + -ant- -ant

recalcitrance, recalcitrancy, noun
nonrecalcitrance, noun
nonrecalcitrancy, noun
nonrecalcitrant, adjective
unrecalcitrant, adjective


1. resistant, rebellious, opposed. See unruly.
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World English Dictionary
recalcitrant (rɪˈkælsɪtrənt)
 
adj
1.  not susceptible to control or authority; refractory
 
n
2.  a recalcitrant person
 
[C19: via French from Latin recalcitrāre, from re- + calcitrāre to kick, from calx heel]
 
re'calcitrance
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

recalcitrant
1843, from Fr. récalcitrant, lit. "kicking back" (17c.-18c.), pp. of recalcitrare "to kick back," from re- "back" + L. calcitrare "to kick," from calx (gen. calcis) "heel." Verb recalcitrate "to kick out" is attested from 1623; sense of "resist obstinately" is from 1759.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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