recrimination

[ri-krim-uh-ney-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of recriminating, or countercharging: Hope gave way to recrimination with both sides claiming the moral high ground.
2.
a countercharge: The poll suggests that the public is frustrated by the bickering and recriminations.

self-recrimination, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

recriminate

[ri-krim-uh-neyt]
verb (used without object), recriminated, recriminating.
1.
to bring a countercharge against an accuser.
verb (used with object), recriminated, recriminating.
2.
to accuse in return.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Medieval Latin recrīminātus (past participle of recrīminārī to accuse in turn), equivalent to re- re- + crīmin-, stem of crīmen accusation, blame (see crime) + -ātus -ate1

recrimination, noun
recriminative, recriminatory [ri-krim-uh-nuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
recriminator, noun
unrecriminative, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To recriminations
Collins
World English Dictionary
recriminate (rɪˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt)
 
vb
(intr) to return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations
 
[C17: from Medieval Latin recrīmināre, from Latin crīminārī to accuse, from crīmen an accusation; see crime]
 
re'criminative
 
adj
 
re'criminatory
 
adj
 
re'criminator
 
n

recrimination (rɪˌkrɪmɪˈneɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or an instance of recriminating
2.  law a charge made by an accused against his accuser; countercharge

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

recriminate
c.1600, from M.L. recriminatus, pp. of recriminari "to make charges against," from L. re- "back, again" + criminari "to accuse," from crimen (gen. criminis) "a charge" (see crime).

recrimination
1610s, from Fr. récrimination, from M.L. recriminationem, from recriminari (see recriminate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The recriminations are likely to grow as rating agencies, slow to act at first,
  bow to the inevitable and revise their opinions.
But there are sure to be recriminations about how the day was handled.
The breakdown of control led to still more bitter recriminations.
Her predicament gives rise to recriminations, complications and a twisted back
  story of betrayal and disappointment.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature