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redemption

[ri-demp-shuh n] /rɪˈdɛmp ʃən/
noun
1.
an act of redeeming or atoning for a fault or mistake, or the state of being redeemed.
2.
deliverance; rescue.
3.
Theology. deliverance from sin; salvation.
4.
atonement for guilt.
5.
repurchase, as of something sold.
6.
paying off, as of a mortgage, bond, or note.
7.
recovery by payment, as of something pledged.
8.
conversion of paper money into specie.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English redempcioun (< Middle French redemption) < Late Latin redēmptiōn- (stem of redēmptiō), equivalent to Latin redēmpt(us) (past participle of redimere to redeem) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
redemptional, adjective
redemptionless, adjective
nonredemption, noun
postredemption, noun
preredemption, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for redemptional

redemption

/rɪˈdɛmpʃən/
noun
1.
the act or process of redeeming
2.
the state of being redeemed
3.
(Christianity)
  1. deliverance from sin through the incarnation, sufferings, and death of Christ
  2. atonement for guilt
4.
conversion of paper money into bullion or specie
5.
  1. removal of a financial obligation by paying off a note, bond, etc
  2. (as modifier): redemption date
Derived Forms
redemptional, redemptive, redemptory, adjective
redemptively, adverb
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Latin redemptiō a buying back; see redeem
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for redemptional

redemption

n.

mid-14c., "deliverance from sin," from Old French redemcion (12c.) and directly from Latin redemptionem (nominative redemptio) "a buying back, releasing, ransoming" (also "bribery"), noun of action from past participle stem of redimere "to redeem, buy back," from red- "back" (see re-) + emere "to take, buy, gain, procure" (see exempt). The -d- is from the Old Latin habit of using red- as the form of re- before vowels. In the Mercian hymns, Latin redemptionem is glossed by Old English alesnisse.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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redemptional in the Bible

the purchase back of something that had been lost, by the payment of a ransom. The Greek word so rendered is _apolutrosis_, a word occurring nine times in Scripture, and always with the idea of a ransom or price paid, i.e., redemption by a lutron (see Matt. 20:28; Mark 10:45). There are instances in the LXX. Version of the Old Testament of the use of _lutron_ in man's relation to man (Lev. 19:20; 25:51; Ex. 21:30; Num. 35:31, 32; Isa. 45:13; Prov. 6:35), and in the same sense of man's relation to God (Num. 3:49; 18:15). There are many passages in the New Testament which represent Christ's sufferings under the idea of a ransom or price, and the result thereby secured is a purchase or redemption (comp. Acts 20:28; 1 Cor. 6:19, 20; Gal. 3:13; 4:4, 5; Eph. 1:7; Col. 1:14; 1 Tim. 2:5, 6; Titus 2:14; Heb. 9:12; 1 Pet. 1:18, 19; Rev. 5:9). The idea running through all these texts, however various their reference, is that of payment made for our redemption. The debt against us is not viewed as simply cancelled, but is fully paid. Christ's blood or life, which he surrendered for them, is the "ransom" by which the deliverance of his people from the servitude of sin and from its penal consequences is secured. It is the plain doctrine of Scripture that "Christ saves us neither by the mere exercise of power, nor by his doctrine, nor by his example, nor by the moral influence which he exerted, nor by any subjective influence on his people, whether natural or mystical, but as a satisfaction to divine justice, as an expiation for sin, and as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law, thus reconciling us to God by making it consistent with his perfection to exercise mercy toward sinners" (Hodge's Systematic Theology).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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