redirect

[ree-di-rekt, -dahy-]
verb (used with object)
1.
to direct again.
2.
to change the direction or focus of: He redirected the children's energies toward building a sand castle instead of throwing sand at each other.
adjective
3.
Law. pertaining to the examination of a witness by the party calling him or her, after cross-examination.

Origin:
1835–45; re- + direct

redirection, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
redirect (ˌriːdɪˈrɛkt, ˌriːdaɪ-)
 
vb
to direct (someone or something) to a different place or by a different route
 
redi'rection
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

redirect
1844, from re- "back, again" + direct.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It will be realized by professors taking leadership to redirect public policy.
If you're not sure what to do next, you need to think about how to redirect
  your skills.
Their scientists and engineers need to redirect their focus to develop sources
  of energy such as safe nuclear power plants.
When the projectile exits slam the door shut and redirect the radioactive steam
  back underground.
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