redundantly

redundant

[ri-duhn-duhnt]
adjective
1.
characterized by verbosity or unnecessary repetition in expressing ideas; prolix: a redundant style.
2.
being in excess; exceeding what is usual or natural: a redundant part.
3.
having some unusual or extra part or feature.
4.
characterized by superabundance or superfluity: lush, redundant vegetation.
5.
Engineering.
a.
(of a structural member) not necessary for resisting statically determined stresses.
b.
(of a structure) having members designed to resist other than statically determined stresses; hyperstatic.
c.
noting a complete truss having additional members for resisting eccentric loads. Compare complete ( def 8 ), incomplete ( def 3 ).
d.
(of a device, circuit, computer system, etc.) having excess or duplicate parts that can continue to perform in the event of malfunction of some of the parts.
6.
Linguistics. characterized by redundancy; predictable.
7.
Computers. containing more bits or characters than are required, as a parity bit inserted for checking purposes.
8.
Chiefly British. removed or laid off from a job.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin redundant- (stem of redundāns), present participle of redundāre to flow back, overflow, be excessive. See redound, -ant

redundantly, adverb


1. verbose, repetitive. See wordy. 2. excessive; useless; superfluous, tautologous.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
redundant (rɪˈdʌndənt)
 
adj
1.  surplus to requirements; unnecessary or superfluous
2.  verbose or tautological
3.  deprived of one's job because it is no longer necessary for efficient operation: he has been made redundant
4.  (of components, information, etc) duplicated or added as a precaution against failure, error, etc
 
[C17: from Latin redundans overflowing, from redundāre to run back, stream over; see redound]
 
re'dundantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

redundant
1594, from L. redundantem (nom. redundans), prp. of redundare "come back, contribute," lit. "overflow," from re- "again" + undare "rise in waves," from unda "a wave" (see water).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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