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refute

[ri-fyoot] /rɪˈfyut/
verb (used with object), refuted, refuting.
1.
to prove to be false or erroneous, as an opinion or charge.
2.
to prove (a person) to be in error.
Origin
1505-1515
1505-15; < Latin refūtāre to check, suppress, refute, rebut, equivalent to re- re- + -fūtāre presumably, “to beat” (attested only with the prefixes con- and re-; cf. confute)
Related forms
refutable
[ri-fyoo-tuh-buh l, ref-yuh-tuh-] /rɪˈfyu tə bəl, ˈrɛf yə tə-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
refutability, noun
refutably, adverb
refuter, noun
self-refuted, adjective
self-refuting, adjective
unrefutable, adjective
unrefutably, adverb
unrefuted, adjective
unrefuting, adjective
Can be confused
deny, disapprove, disprove, rebut, refute (see synonym study at deny)
dispute, refute.
repudiate, refute, refudiate (see word story at refudiate)
Synonyms
1. disprove, rebut. 1, 2. confute.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for refutes
  • Perhaps our brains can evolve in more than one direction, which in a way refutes those alarmist researchers.
  • First of all, research refutes the widespread belief that even low levels of radiation increase your risk of cancer.
  • They found water vapor of all different temperatures around the star, which refutes the vaporized comet theory.
  • But this refutes an argument that historians don't make.
  • By a rare cinematic accident, it successfully refutes its sales bracket.
  • He does publish data wether it supports or refutes his position.
  • If it was false, find me a report where he refutes it.
  • Which kind of refutes anyone who uses arguments about teeth, intestines, and other biological observations.
  • You've made the claim that you know of evidence that refutes it, yet refuse to go into detail.
  • Overwhelming evidence widely communicated refutes the autism link.
British Dictionary definitions for refutes

refute

/rɪˈfjuːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to prove (a statement, theory, charge, etc) of (a person) to be false or incorrect; disprove
2.
to deny (a claim, charge, allegation, etc)
Derived Forms
refutable (ˈrɛfjʊtəbəl; rɪˈfjuː-) adjective
refutability (ˌrɛfjʊtəˈbɪlɪtɪ; rɪˌfjuː-) noun
refutably, adverb
refuter, noun
Usage note
The use of refute to mean deny is thought by many people to be incorrect
Word Origin
C16: from Latin refūtāre to rebut
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for refutes

refute

v.

1510s, "refuse, reject," from Middle French réfuter (16c.) and directly from Latin refutare "drive back; rebut, disprove; repress, repel, resist, oppose," from re- "back" (see re-) + -futare "to beat," probably from PIE root *bhau- "to strike down" (see bat (n.1)).

Meaning "prove wrong" dates from 1540s. Since c.1964 linguists have frowned on the subtle shift in meaning towards "to deny," as it is used in connection with allegation. Related: Refuted; refuting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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