rehabilitate

[ree-huh-bil-i-teyt, ree-uh-]
verb (used with object), rehabilitated, rehabilitating.
1.
to restore to a condition of good health, ability to work, or the like.
2.
to restore to good condition, operation, or management, as a bankrupt business.
3.
to reestablish the good reputation of (a person, one's character or name, etc.).
4.
to restore formally to former capacity, standing, rank, rights, or privileges.
verb (used without object), rehabilitated, rehabilitating.
5.
to undergo rehabilitation.

Origin:
1570–80; < Medieval Latin rehabilitātus, past participle of rehabilitāre to restore. See re-, habilitate

rehabilitation, noun
rehabilitative, adjective
rehabilitator, noun
nonrehabilitation, noun
nonrehabilitative, adjective
unrehabilitated, adjective


2. salvage, restore, recondition, reconstruct, refurbish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rehabilitate (ˌriːəˈbɪlɪˌteɪt)
 
vb
1.  to help (a person who has acquired a disability or addiction or who has just been released from prison) to readapt to society or a new job, as by vocational guidance, retraining, or therapy
2.  to restore to a former position or rank
3.  to restore the good reputation of
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin rehabilitāre to restore, from re- + Latin habilitās skill, ability]
 
reha'bilitative
 
adj

rehabilitation (ˌriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or process of rehabilitating
2.  med
 a.  the treatment of physical disabilities by massage, electrotherapy, or exercises
 b.  (as modifier): rehabilitation centre

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rehabilitation
1533, from M.Fr. réhabilitation, from M.L. rehabilitationem "restoration," from rehabilitatus, pp. of rehabilitare, from re- "again" + habitare "make fit," from L. habilis "easily managed, fit." Specifically of criminals, addicts, etc., from 1940. Slang shortening rehab is from 1948. The verb
rehabilitate is attested from 1580.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

rehabilitate re·ha·bil·i·tate (rē'hə-bĭl'ĭ-tāt')
v. re·ha·bil·i·tat·ed, re·ha·bil·i·tat·ing, re·ha·bil·i·tates

  1. To restore to good health or useful life, as through therapy and education.

  2. To restore to good condition, operation, or capacity.


re'ha·bil'i·ta'tion n.
re'ha·bil'i·ta'tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

rehabilitation definition


In politics, the restoration to favor of a political leader whose views or actions were formerly considered unacceptable. (Compare nonperson.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Prisons were built around the noble ideas of rehabilitation.
But after controlling for recidivism and rehabilitation programmes, the
  meal-related pattern remained.
Our own work indicates that the mirror system can be enlisted to expedite the
  rehabilitation of hemorrhagic stroke patients.
Five bird and butterfly friendly home gardens plus a visit to a raptor
  rehabilitation facility.
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