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remote

[ri-moht] /rɪˈmoʊt/
adjective, remoter, remotest.
1.
far apart; far distant in space; situated at some distance away:
the remote jungles of Brazil.
2.
out-of-the-way; secluded:
a remote village; a remote mountaintop.
3.
distant in time:
remote antiquity.
4.
distant in relationship or connection:
a remote ancestor.
5.
operating or controlled from a distance, as by remote control:
a remote telephone answering machine.
6.
far off; abstracted; removed:
principles remote from actions.
7.
not direct, primary, or proximate; not directly involved or influential:
the remote causes of the war.
8.
slight or faint; unlikely:
not the remotest idea; a remote chance.
9.
reserved and distant in manner; aloof; not warmly cordial.
noun
10.
Radio and Television. a broadcast, usually live, from a location outside a studio.
11.
remote control (def 2).
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin remōtus, past participle of removēre to move back; see remove, motion
Related forms
remotely, adverb
remoteness, noun
unremote, adjective
unremotely, adverb
unremoteness, noun
Synonyms
2. sequestered, isolated, removed, apart, solitary. 8. inconsiderable. 9. withdrawn.
Antonyms
1. close, near.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for remoteness
  • With legalization and regulation, there would be no more necessity for growers to use these areas for their remoteness.
  • The bird's obscurity is due in large part to the remoteness of its habitat.
  • For example, it is impossible to be a mediocre small car maker and survive because of geographical remoteness.
  • In strict science all persons underlie the same condition of an infinite remoteness.
  • Cheap land and remoteness seem to have been its selling points.
  • The court simply found remoteness to be the overriding factor.
  • The remoteness of the site was brilliantly considered in both the design parti and the fabrication and construction scenario.
  • Transport and communications links have taken away the sense of remoteness felt by past generations.
  • The remoteness of the affected area will make it all the harder.
  • There is water for cooling, fast fibre-optic links, and the remoteness provides security.
British Dictionary definitions for remoteness

remote

/rɪˈməʊt/
adjective
1.
located far away; distant
2.
far from any centre of population, society, or civilization; out-of-the-way
3.
distant in time
4.
distantly related or connected: a remote cousin
5.
removed, as from the source or point of action
6.
slight or faint (esp in the phrases not the remotest idea, a remote chance)
7.
(of a person's manner) aloof or abstracted
8.
operated from a distance; remote-controlled: a remote monitor
Derived Forms
remotely, adverb
remoteness, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin remōtus far removed, from removēre, from re- + movēre to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for remoteness

remote

adj.

mid-15c., from Middle French remot or directly from Latin remotus "afar off, remote, distant in place," past participle of removere "move back or away" (see remove (v.)). Related: Remotely; remoteness. Remote control "fact of controlling from a distance" is recorded from 1904; as a device which allows this from 1920.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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