follow Dictionary.com

Why turkey has the same name as Turkey

removed

[ri-moovd] /rɪˈmuvd/
adjective
1.
remote; separate; not connected with; distinct from.
2.
distant by a given number of degrees of descent or kinship: A first cousin once removed is the child of one's first cousin or the first cousin of one’s parent.
The grandchildren of one's first cousin are one's first cousins twice removed.
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; remove + -ed2
Related forms
removedly
[ri-moo-vid-lee, -moovd-] /rɪˈmu vɪd li, -ˈmuvd-/ (Show IPA),
adverb
removedness, noun
unremoved, adjective
Synonyms
1. withdrawn, abstracted; isolated, solitary, apart.

remove

[ri-moov] /rɪˈmuv/
verb (used with object), removed, removing.
1.
to move from a place or position; take away or off:
to remove the napkins from the table.
2.
to take off or shed (an article of clothing):
to remove one's jacket.
3.
to move or shift to another place or position; transfer:
She removed the painting to another wall.
4.
to put out; send away:
to remove a tenant.
5.
to dismiss or force from a position or office; discharge:
They removed him for embezzling.
6.
to take away, withdraw, or eliminate:
to remove the threat of danger.
7.
to get rid of; do away with; put an end to:
to remove a stain; to remove the source of disease.
8.
to kill; assassinate.
verb (used without object), removed, removing.
9.
to move from one place to another, especially to another locality or residence:
We remove to Newport early in July.
10.
to go away; depart; disappear.
noun
11.
the act of removing.
12.
a removal from one place, as of residence, to another.
13.
the distance by which one person, place, or thing is separated from another:
to see something at a remove.
14.
a mental distance from the reality of something as a result of psychological detachment or lack of experience:
to criticize something at a remove.
15.
a degree of difference, as that due to descent, transmission, etc.:
a folk survival, at many removes, of a druidic rite.
16.
a step or degree, as in a graded scale.
17.
British. a promotion of a pupil to a higher class or division at school.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English removen (v.) < Old French remouvoir < Latin removēre. See re-, move
Related forms
preremove, verb (used with object), preremoved, preremoving.
Synonyms
1. dislodge. 3. displace, transport. 8. murder.
Antonyms
1. leave. 9. remain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for removed
  • In pleaching, side branches of adjoining trees are intertwined in one flat plane and all the rest of the branches are removed.
  • First, they removed large portions of an existing lawn and oversize deck.
  • Shutters were removed, exposing the handsome steel-framed window and increasing the natural light.
  • In the family's other side yard, the couple removed a hulking tree that shaded an otherwise sunny space.
  • The renovation was easy because no walls had to be removed and only one door was closed off.
  • We've removed all possible straw from the coop, you'll be happy to know, and are thinking about putting down pine shavings.
  • They don't rust, are light and easily removed when repotting.
  • We also removed that deck a few years later and even though there is a new one, it doesn't seem to harbor slugs.
  • To deter cutworms, make collars from paper cups or metal cans with the ends removed.
  • Their names, contact information, and other identifying details have been removed.
British Dictionary definitions for removed

removed

/rɪˈmuːvd/
adjective
1.
separated by distance or abstract distinction
2.
(postpositive) separated by a degree of descent or kinship: the child of a person's first cousin is his first cousin once removed
Derived Forms
removedness (rɪˈmuːvɪdnɪs) noun

remove

/rɪˈmuːv/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
to take away and place elsewhere
2.
to displace (someone) from office; dismiss
3.
to do away with (a grievance, cause of anxiety, etc); abolish
4.
to cause (dirt, stains, or anything unwanted) to disappear; get rid of
5.
(euphemistic) to assassinate; kill
6.
(intransitive) (formal) to change the location of one's home or place of business: the publishers have removed to Mayfair
noun
7.
the act of removing, esp (formal) a removal of one's residence or place of work
8.
the degree of difference separating one person, thing, or condition from another: only one remove from madness
9.
(Brit) (in certain schools) a class or form, esp one for children of about 14 years, designed to introduce them to the greater responsibilities of a more senior position in the school
10.
(at a formal dinner, formerly) a dish to be changed while the rest of the course remains on the table
Derived Forms
removable, adjective
removability, removableness, noun
removably, adverb
remover, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French removoir, from Latin removēre; see move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for removed
adj.

"distant in relationship" (by some expressed degree), 1540s, from past participle of remove (v.). Meaning "remote, separated, secluded" is from 1610s.

remove

v.

early 14c., "move, take away, dismiss," from Old French removoir "move, stir; leave, depart; take away," from Latin removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (see move (v.)). Related: Removed; removing.

n.

1550s, "act of removing," from remove (v.). Sense of "distance or space by which any thing is removed from another" is attested from 1620s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for removed

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for removed

13
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with removed