repercussion

[ree-per-kuhsh-uhn, rep-er-]
noun
1.
an effect or result, often indirect or remote, of some event or action: The repercussions of the quarrel were widespread.
2.
the state of being driven back by a resisting body.
3.
a rebounding or recoil of something after impact.
4.
reverberation; echo.
5.
Music. (in a fugue) the point after the development of an episode at which the subject and answer appear again.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin repercussiōn- (stem of repercussiō) a rebounding, equivalent to repercuss(us) (past participle of repercutere to strike back) + -iōn- -ion. See re-, percussion

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World English Dictionary
repercussion (ˌriːpəˈkʌʃən)
 
n
1.  (often plural) a result or consequence, esp one that is somewhat removed from the action or event which precipitated it: the repercussions of the war are still keenly felt
2.  a recoil after impact; a rebound
3.  a reflection, esp of sound; echo or reverberation
4.  music the reappearance of a fugal subject and answer after an episode
 
[C16: from Latin repercussiō, from repercutere to strike back; see percussion]
 
reper'cussive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

repercussion
c.1400 (implied in repercussive) "act of driving back," from M.Fr. répercussion (14c.), from L. repercusionem (nom. repercussio), from repercussus, pp. of repercutere "to strike or beat back," from re- "back" + percutere "to strike or thrust through" (see
percussion). Meaning "reverberation, echo" first recorded 1595; the metaphoric extension is recorded from 1625.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As you point out, repercussions from this despotic conduct linger on a century
  later.
If so, that temporarily propped-up self-esteem usually gets clobbered by the
  repercussions of procrastination.
But any major policy change in a big country is liable to serious repercussions
  one way or the other.
Some native groups fear the repercussions of a renewed backlash against the
  harp seal harvest.
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