respice

spice

[spahys]
noun
1.
any of a class of pungent or aromatic substances of vegetable origin, as pepper, cinnamon, or cloves, used as seasoning, preservatives, etc.
2.
such substances collectively or as material: Cookies without spice can be tasteless.
3.
a spicy or aromatic odor or fragrance.
4.
something that gives zest: a spice of humor in his solemnity.
5.
a piquant, interesting element or quality; zest; piquancy: The anecdotes lent spice to her talk.
6.
Archaic. a small quantity of something; trace; bit.
verb (used with object), spiced, spicing.
7.
to prepare or season with a spice or spices.
8.
to give zest, piquancy, or interest to by something added.

Origin:
1175–1225; (noun) Middle English, aphetic form of Old French espice (French épice) < Latin speciēs appearance, sort, kind (see species), in Late Latin (plural): goods, wares, spices, drugs; (v.) Middle English spicen, in part derivative of the noun, in part < Old French espicer, derivative of espice

spiceable, adjective
spiceless, adjective
spicelike, adjective
overspice, verb, overspiced, overspicing.
respice, verb (used with object), respiced, respicing.
unspiced, adjective
well-spiced, adjective


5. tang, gusto, zip.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
spice (spaɪs)
 
n
1.  a.  any of a variety of aromatic vegetable substances, such as ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, used as flavourings
 b.  these substances collectively
2.  something that represents or introduces zest, charm, or gusto
3.  rare a small amount
4.  dialect (Yorkshire) confectionery
 
vb
5.  to prepare or flavour (food) with spices
6.  to introduce charm or zest into
 
[C13: from Old French espice, from Late Latin speciēs (pl) spices, from Latin speciēs (sing) kind; also associated with Late Latin spīcea (unattested) fragrant herb, from Latin spīceus having spikes of foliage; see spica]
 
'spicer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

spice
early 13c., from O.Fr. espice, from L.L. species (pl.) "spices, goods, wares," from L. "kind, sort" (see species). Early druggists recognized four "types" of spices: saffron, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg. Fig. sense of "slight touch or trace of something" is recorded from 1530s.
The verb, "to season with spices" is first recorded early 14c. (implied in spiced). Spicy is from 1560s; in the fig. sense of "racy, salacious" it dates from 1844. Spice-cake first attested 1520s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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