Dictionary.com Unabridged

retrace

[ri-treys]
verb (used with object), retraced, retracing.
1.
to trace backward; go back over: to retrace one's steps.
2.
to go back over with the memory.
3.
to go over again with the sight or attention.

Origin:
1690–1700; < French retracer, Middle French retracier, equivalent to re- re- + tracier to trace1

retraceable, adjective
retracement, noun
nonretraceable, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To retrace
Collins
World English Dictionary
retrace (rɪˈtreɪs)
 
vb
1.  to go back over (one's steps, a route, etc) again: we retraced the route we took last summer
2.  to go over (a past event) in the mind; recall
3.  to go over (a story, account, etc) from the beginning
 
re'traceable
 
adj
 
re'tracement
 
n

re-trace (riːˈtreɪs)
 
vb
(tr) to trace (a map, drawing, etc) again

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

retrace
1697, from Fr. retracer "to trace again," from M.Fr. retracier, from re- "again" + tracier "to trace" (see trace).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
But having killed his prey, the hunter would want to make a beeline for home
  rather than retrace his steps exactly.
Links you've already visited leap out in blue so you can retrace your steps
  easily.
His concentration is so scattered that it takes a couple of hours before it
  occurs to him to retrace his steps.
To return to the trailhead, simply retrace the route back down the canyon.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature