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retrieve

[ri-treev] /rɪˈtriv/
verb (used with object), retrieved, retrieving.
1.
to recover or regain:
to retrieve the stray ball.
2.
to bring back to a former and better state; restore:
to retrieve one's fortunes.
3.
to make amends for:
to retrieve an error.
4.
to make good; repair:
to retrieve a loss.
5.
Hunting. (of hunting dogs) to fetch (killed or wounded game).
6.
to draw back or reel in (a fishing line).
7.
to rescue; save.
8.
(in tennis, squash, handball, etc.) to make an in-bounds return of (a shot requiring running with the hand extended).
9.
Computers. to locate and read (data) from storage, as for display on a monitor.
verb (used without object), retrieved, retrieving.
10.
Hunting. to retrieve game.
11.
to retrieve a fishing line.
noun
12.
an act of retrieving; recovery.
13.
the possibility of recovery.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English retreven < Middle French retroev-, retreuv-, tonic stem of retrouver to find again, equivalent to re- re- + trouver to find; see trover
Related forms
retrievable, adjective
retrievability, noun
nonretrievable, adjective
unretrievable, adjective
unretrieved, adjective
Synonyms
1. See recover.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for retrieved
  • Jay then reached into his own jacket and retrieved the cash, theater tickets and photo.
  • All meeting minutes are taken this way, and they can be retrieved by anyone after several weeks or months.
  • Several of them leaped into the concrete and retrieved the scrap.
  • Alternatively, some clots can be physically retrieved through a blood vessel, but few hospitals practice this technique.
  • Fuel stored in a central location in dry casks could easily be retrieved and reprocessed.
  • Robots move shelves with popular items closer to the workers, where the shelves can be quickly retrieved.
  • When a memory is formed it is consolidated, but each time it's retrieved it becomes unstable again.
  • Hower also retrieved a weathered contraption perched at the entrance to one of the vents.
  • Too many caps to be retrieved at the bedside of indiscretion, too much of a gloss.
  • The full text of the preprint could then be retrieved by querying the computer.
British Dictionary definitions for retrieved

retrieve

/rɪˈtriːv/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
to get or fetch back again; recover he retrieved his papers from various people's drawers
2.
to bring back to a more satisfactory state; revive
3.
to extricate from trouble or danger; rescue or save
4.
to recover or make newly available (stored information) from a computer system
5.
(also intransitive) (of a dog) to find and fetch (shot game)
6.
(tennis, squash, badminton) to return successfully (a shot difficult to reach)
7.
to recall; remember
noun
8.
the act of retrieving
9.
the chance of being retrieved
Derived Forms
retrievable, adjective
retrievability, noun
retrievably, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Old French retrover, from re- + trouver to find, perhaps from Vulgar Latin tropāre (unattested) to compose; see trover, troubadour
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for retrieved
retrieve
c.1410, retreve, from M.Fr. retruev-, stem of O.Fr. retrouver "find again," from re- "again" + trouver "to find," probably from V.L. *tropare "to compose" (see trove). Altered 16c. to retrive; modern form is from c.1650. Retriever "dog used for retrieving game" first recorded 1486.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
14
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