revisionary

revision

[ri-vizh-uhn]
noun
1.
the act or work of revising.
2.
a process of revising.
3.
a revised form or version, as of a book.

Origin:
1605–15; < Late Latin revīsiōn- (stem of revīsiō), equivalent to Latin revīs(us) (see revise) + -iōn- -ion

revisional, revisionary, adjective
nonrevision, noun
prerevision, noun
prorevision, adjective


1. alteration, correction, emendation.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
revision (rɪˈvɪʒən)
 
n
1.  the act or process of revising
2.  (Brit) the process of rereading a subject or notes on it, esp in preparation for an examination
3.  a corrected or new version of a book, article, etc

revisionary (rɪˈvɪʒənərɪ)
 
adj
of or relating to a new or different version of something

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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"We had got a loaf of home-made bread, and musk and water melons for dessert. For this farmer, a clever and well-disposed man, cultivated a large patch of melons for the Hooksett and Concord markets. He hospitably entertained us the next day, exhibiting his hop-fields and kiln and melon-patch, warning us to step over the tight rope which surrounded the latter at a foot from the ground, while he pointed to a little bower at one corner, where it connected with the lock of a gun ranging with the line, and where, he informed us, he sometimes sat in pleasant nights to defend his premises against thieves. We stepped high over the line, and sympathized with our host's on the whole quite human, if not humane, interest in the success of his experiment. That night especially thieves were to be expected, from rumors in the atmosphere, and the priming was not wet. He was a Methodist man, who had his dwelling between the river and Uncannunuc Mountain; who there belonged, and stayed at home there, and by the encouragement of distant political organizations, and by his own tenacity, held a property in his melons, and continued to plant. We suggested melon seeds of new varieties and fruit of foreign flavor to be added to his stock. We had come away up here among the hills to learn the impartial and unbribable influence of Nature. Strawberries and melons grew as well in one man's garden as another's, and the sun lodges as kindly under his hillside,—when we had imagined that she inclined rather to some few earnest and faithful souls whom we know."
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