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rhyme royal

noun, Prosody
1.
a form of verse introduced into English by Chaucer, consisting of seven-line stanzas of iambic pentameter in which there are three rhymes, the first line rhyming with the third, the second with the fourth and fifth, and the sixth with the seventh.
Origin
1835-1845
1835-45
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for rhyme-royal

rhyme royal

noun
1.
(prosody) a stanzaic form introduced into English verse by Chaucer, consisting of seven lines of iambic pentameter rhyming a b a b b c c
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Encyclopedia Article for rhyme-royal

rhyme royal

seven-line iambic pentameter stanza rhyming ababbcc. The rhyme royal was first used in English verse in the 14th century by Geoffrey Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde and The Parlement of Foules. Traditionally, the name rhyme royal is said to derive from The Kingis Quair ("The King's Book), attributed to James I of Scotland (1394-1437), but some critics trace the name to the French chant royal. Chaucer probably borrowed it from the French poet and musician Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300-77), who may have invented it or derived it from earlier French and Provencal poets

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Word Value for rhyme

13
12
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