richard, sir

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Burton

[bur-tn]
noun
1.
Harold Hitz [hits] , 1888–1964, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1945–58.
2.
Sir Richard (Richard Jenkins) 1925–84, English actor, born in Wales.
3.
Sir Richard Francis, 1821–90, English explorer, Orientalist, and writer.
4.
Robert ("Democritus Junior") 1577–1640, English clergyman and author.
5.
a town in central Michigan.
6.
a male given name.

Grenville

[gren-vil]
noun
1.
George, 1712–70, British statesman: prime minister 1763–65.
2.
Also, Greynville. Sir Richard, 1541?–91, English naval commander.
3.
William Wyndham, Baron, 1759–1834, British statesman: prime minister 1806–07 (son of George Grenville).

Greynville

[greyn-vil, gren-]
noun
Sir Richard, Grenville, Sir Richard.

Owen

[oh-uhn]
noun
1.
Sir Richard, 1804–92, English zoologist and anatomist.
2.
Robert, 1771–1858, Welsh social reformer in Great Britain and the U.S.
3.
Wilfred, 1893–1918, English poet.
4.
a male given name.

Steele

[steel]
noun
1.
Sir Richard, 1672–1729, English essayist, journalist, dramatist, and political leader; born in Ireland.
2.
a mountain in SW Yukon Territory, Canada, on the Alaska border in the St. Elias Range. 16,644 feet (5074 meters).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Arkwright (ˈɑːkraɪt)
 
n
Sir Richard. 1732--92, English cotton manufacturer: inventor of the spinning frame (1769) which produced cotton thread strong enough to be used as a warp

burton (ˈbɜːtən)
 
n
1.  nautical a kind of light hoisting tackle
2.  slang (Brit) go for a burton
 a.  to be broken, useless, or lost
 b.  to die
 
[C15: of uncertain origin]

Burton (ˈbɜːtən)
 
n
1.  Sir Richard Francis. 1821--90, English explorer, Orientalist, and writer who discovered Lake Tanganyika with John Speke (1858); produced the first unabridged translation of The Thousand Nights and a Night (1885--88)
2.  Richard, real name Richard Jenkins. 1925--84, Welsh stage and film actor: films include Becket (1964), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), and Equus (1977)
3.  Robert, pen name Democritus Junior. 1577--1640, English clergyman, scholar, and writer, noted for his Anatomy of Melancholy (1621)
4.  Tim. born 1958, US film director whose work includes Beetlejuice (1988), Batman (1989), Ed Wood (1994), and Big Fish (2003)

Grenville (ˈɡrɛnvɪl)
 
n
1.  George. 1712--70, British statesman; prime minister (1763--65). His policy of taxing the American colonies precipitated the War of Independence
2.  Kate. born 1950. Australian writer. Her novels include Lilian's Story (1985), The Idea of Perfection (2002) and The Secret River (2005)
3.  Sir Richard. ?1541--91, English naval commander. He was fatally wounded aboard his ship, the Revenge, during a lone battle with a fleet of Spanish treasure ships
4.  William Wyndham, Baron Grenville, son of George Grenville. 1759--1834, British statesman; prime minister (1806--07) of the coalition government known as the "ministry of all the talents"

Owen (ˈəʊɪn)
 
n
1.  David (Anthony Llewellyn), Baron. born 1938, British politician: Labour foreign secretary (1977--79); cofounder of the Social Democratic Party (1981) and its leader (1983--87): leader (1988--92) of the section of the Social Democratic Party that did not merge with the Liberal Party in 1988; peace envoy to Bosnia-Herzegovina (1992--94)
2.  Michael (James). born 1979, British footballer; plays for Newcastle United (from 2005) and England (from 1997)
3.  Sir Richard. 1804--92, English comparative anatomist and palaeontologist
4.  Robert. 1771--1858, Welsh industrialist and social reformer. He formed a model industrial community at New Lanark, Scotland, and pioneered cooperative societies. His books include New View of Society (1813)
5.  Wilfred. 1893--1918, English poet of World War I, who was killed in action

Steele (stiːl)
 
n
Sir Richard. 1672--1729, British essayist and dramatist, born in Ireland; with Joseph Addison he was the chief contributor to the periodicals The Tatler (1709--11) and The Spectator (1711--12)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Owen
Celtic proper name, ultimately from Gk. eugenes "well-born;" via Gael. Eoghann, O.Ir. Eogan, O.Welsh Eugein, Ougein. In Medieval records, frequently Latinized as Eugenius; the form Eugene emerged in Scotland by 1178. The Breton form Even led to modern Fr. Ivain. Owenite in ref. to the communistic system
of social reformer Robert Owen (1771-1858) is attested from 1829.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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