Richter scale

Richter scale

noun
a scale, ranging from 1 to 10, for indicating the intensity of an earthquake.

Origin:
1935–40; after Charles F. Richter (1900–85), U.S. seismologist

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World English Dictionary
Richter scale (ˈrɪxtə)
 
n
Compare Mercalli scale See also magnitude a scale for expressing the magnitude of an earthquake in terms of the logarithm of the amplitude of the ground wave; values range from 0 to over 9
 
[C20: named after Charles Richter (1900--85) US seismologist]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

Richter scale
1938, devised by U.S. seismologist Charles Francis Richter (1900-85).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Richter scale   (rĭk'tər)  Pronunciation Key 
A logarithmic scale used to rate the strength or total energy of earthquakes. The scale has no upper limit but usually ranges from 1 to 9. Because it is logarithmic, an earthquake rated as 5 is ten times as powerful as one rated as 4. An earthquake with a magnitude of 1 is detectable only by seismographs; one with a magnitude of 7 is a major earthquake. The Richter scale is named after the American seismologist Charles Francis Richter (1900-1985). See Note at earthquake.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Richter scale [(rik-tuhr)]

A scale used to rate the intensity of earthquakes. The scale is open-ended, with each succeeding level representing ten times as much energy as the last. A serious earthquake might rate six to eight, and very destructive quakes rate higher.

Note: No quake greater than nine has ever been recorded.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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