ridicule

[rid-i-kyool]
noun
1.
speech or action intended to cause contemptuous laughter at a person or thing; derision.
verb (used with object), ridiculed, ridiculing.
2.
to deride; make fun of.

Origin:
1665–75; < Latin rīdiculum a joke, equivalent to rīd(ēre) to laugh + -i- -i- + -culum -cule2

ridiculer, noun
self-ridicule, noun
unridiculed, adjective


1. mockery, raillery, sarcasm, satire, irony. 2. banter, chaff, rally, twit, burlesque, satirize, lampoon. Ridicule, deride, mock, taunt imply making game of a person, usually in an unkind, jeering way. To ridicule is to make fun of, either sportively and good-humoredly, or unkindly with the intention of humiliating: to ridicule a pretentious person. To deride is to assail one with scornful laughter: to deride a statement of belief. To mock is sometimes playfully, sometimes insultingly, to imitate and caricature the appearance or actions of another: She mocked the seriousness of his expression. To taunt is to call attention to something annoying or humiliating, usually maliciously and exultingly and often in the presence of others: to taunt a candidate about his defeat in an election.


praise.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ridicule (ˈrɪdɪˌkjuːl)
 
n
1.  language or behaviour intended to humiliate or mock; derision
 
vb
2.  (tr) to make fun of, mock, or deride
 
[C17: from French, from Latin rīdiculus, from rīdēre to laugh]
 
'ridiculer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ridicule
1680s, from Fr. ridicule, from L. ridiculum, neut. of ridiculus (see ridiculous). The noun is 1700, from the verb.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Although he was ridiculed at the time, acceptance of the fork soon followed.
Most scientists are afraid of what they might find or how they would be
  ridiculed.
They're not making any money off it, and they know they're going to get
  ridiculed.
They have been praised and criticized, honored and ridiculed, by foes and fans.
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