Try Our Apps


Gobble up these 8 terms for eating


[rid-i-kyool] /ˈrɪd ɪˌkyul/
speech or action intended to cause contemptuous laughter at a person or thing; derision.
verb (used with object), ridiculed, ridiculing.
to deride; make fun of.
Origin of ridicule
1665-75; < Latin rīdiculum a joke, equivalent to rīd(ēre) to laugh + -i- -i- + -culum -cule2
Related forms
ridiculer, noun
self-ridicule, noun
unridiculed, adjective
1. mockery, raillery, sarcasm, satire, irony. 2. banter, chaff, rally, twit, burlesque, satirize, lampoon. Ridicule, deride, mock, taunt imply making game of a person, usually in an unkind, jeering way. To ridicule is to make fun of, either sportively and good-humoredly, or unkindly with the intention of humiliating: to ridicule a pretentious person. To deride is to assail one with scornful laughter: to deride a statement of belief. To mock is sometimes playfully, sometimes insultingly, to imitate and caricature the appearance or actions of another: She mocked the seriousness of his expression. To taunt is to call attention to something annoying or humiliating, usually maliciously and exultingly and often in the presence of others: to taunt a candidate about his defeat in an election.
praise. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for ridiculed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Maui, the son, came along and ridiculed his father for thinking so much of his work.

  • Never in my life did I feel so awkward as then, and it was not strange that you ridiculed me so.

    The Dream Emile Zola
  • Humanitarians and philanthropists were as yet an obscure and ridiculed sect.

    Collections and Recollections George William Erskine Russell
  • I was now called on to ship, and was ridiculed for wishing to turn shad-man.

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • Halstead was inclined to make light of the matter, and ridiculed the girls, but Addison did not say much about it.

    When Life Was Young C. A. Stephens
British Dictionary definitions for ridiculed


language or behaviour intended to humiliate or mock; derision
(transitive) to make fun of, mock, or deride
Derived Forms
ridiculer, noun
Word Origin
C17: from French, from Latin rīdiculus, from rīdēre to laugh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for ridiculed



1680s, "make ridiculous," from ridicule (n.) or else from French ridiculer, from ridicule. Meaning "make fun of" is from c.1700. Related: Ridiculed; ridiculing.


1670s, "absurd thing;" 1680s, "words or actions meant to invoke ridicule," from French ridicule, noun use of adjective (15c.), or from Latin ridiculum "laughing matter, joke," from noun use of neuter of ridiculus (see ridiculous).

"He who brings ridicule to bear against truth, finds in his hand a blade without a hilt." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for ridiculed

Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for ridiculed