rigid

[rij-id]
adjective
1.
stiff or unyielding; not pliant or flexible; hard: a rigid strip of metal.
2.
firmly fixed or set.
3.
inflexible, strict, or severe: a rigid disciplinarian; rigid rules of social behavior.
4.
exacting; thorough; rigorous: a rigid examination.
5.
so as to meet precise standards; stringent: lenses ground to rigid specifications.
6.
Mechanics. of, pertaining to, or noting a body in which the distance between any pair of points remains fixed under all forces; having infinite values for its shear modulus, bulk modulus, and Young's modulus.
7.
Aeronautics.
a.
(of an airship or dirigible) having a form maintained by a stiff, unyielding structure contained within the envelope.
b.
pertaining to a helicopter rotor that is held fixedly at its root.

Origin:
1530–40; < Latin rigidus, equivalent to rig(ēre) to be stiff, stiffen + -idus -id4

rigidity, rigidness, noun
rigidly, adverb
overrigid, adjective
overrigidly, adverb
overrigidness, noun
overrigidity, noun
subrigid, adjective
subrigidly, adverb
subrigidness, noun
subrigidity, noun
unrigid, adjective
unrigidly, adverb
unrigidness, noun


1. unbending, firm, inflexible. 2. immovable, static. 3. austere, stern, unyielding. See strict. 4, 5. demanding.


1. elastic. 3. lax.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rigid (ˈrɪdʒɪd)
 
adj
1.  not bending; physically inflexible or stiff: a rigid piece of plastic
2.  unbending; rigorously strict; severe: rigid rules
 
adv
3.  completely or excessively: the lecture bored him rigid
 
[C16: from Latin rigidus, from rigēre to be stiff]
 
'rigidly
 
adv
 
ri'gidity
 
n
 
'rigidness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rigid
1538, from L. rigidus "hard, stiff, rough, severe," from rigere "be stiff," from PIE *reig- "stretch (tight), bind tightly, make fast" (cf. O.Ir. riag "torture," M.H.G. ric "band, string"), related to L. frigus "cold," Gk. rhigos "frost, cold."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But in retrospect, maybe he fixed his sights a little too rigidly on an
  arbitrary calendar date.
In this last matter the autographs are rigidly respected, the rare intentional
  aberration being scrupulously noted.
Dogma, rigidly prescribed by tradition, stiffens into formalism.
It was a let-down from the conventional heights they had all walked so rigidly.
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