ringers solution

Ringer's solution

[ring-erz]
noun Pharmacology.
an aqueous solution of the chlorides of sodium, potassium, and calcium in the same concentrations as normal body fluids, used chiefly in the laboratory for sustaining tissue.


Origin:
1890–95; named after Sydney Ringer (1835–1910), English physician

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World English Dictionary
Ringer's solution (ˈrɪŋəz)
 
n
a solution containing the chlorides of sodium, potassium, and calcium, used to correct dehydration and, in physiological experiments, as a medium for in vitro preparations
 
[named after its inventor, Sydney Ringer (1836--1910), British pharmacologist]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Ringer's solution n.

  1. A solution resembling blood serum in its salt constituents, containing sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride in water, used topically for burns and wounds.

  2. A salt solution usually used in combination with naturally occurring body substances or with more complex chemically defined nutritive solutions for culturing animal cells.

  3. Ringer's injection.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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