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ripple1

[rip-uh l] /ˈrɪp əl/
verb (used without object), rippled, rippling.
1.
(of a liquid surface) to form small waves or undulations, as water agitated by a breeze.
2.
to flow with a light rise and fall or ruffling of the surface.
3.
(of a solid surface) to form or have small undulations, ruffles, or folds.
4.
(of sound) to undulate or rise and fall in tone, inflection, or magnitude.
verb (used with object), rippled, rippling.
5.
to form small waves or undulations on; agitate lightly.
6.
to mark as if with ripples; give a wavy form to.
noun
7.
a small wave or undulation, as on water.
8.
any similar movement or appearance; a small undulation or wave, as in hair.
9.
a small rapid.
10.
Geology, ripple mark.
11.
a sound, as of water flowing in ripples:
a ripple of laughter.
Origin
1660-1670
1660-70; origin uncertain
Related forms
rippleless, adjective
ripplingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. wave, undulate, purl. 5. ruffle, curl, dimple. 7. wavelet, ruffling. See wave.

ripple2

[rip-uh l] /ˈrɪp əl/
noun
1.
a toothed or comblike device for removing seeds or capsules from flax, hemp, etc.
verb (used with object), rippled, rippling.
2.
to remove the seeds or capsules from (flax or hemp) with a ripple.
Origin
1425-75; late Middle English ripel; cognate with Dutch repel, German Riffel
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for rippling
  • We began picking our way up the rippling sandstone escarpment, now turning red in the afternoon sun.
  • They also painted scenes of life and nature-wheat rippling in the wind, farmers plowing, birds taking flight.
  • Every movement was sure and purposeful as they approached in a rippling of sinew and muscle.
  • Indeed, some believe the new attraction could have a rippling effect that would boost attendance at other area theme parks.
  • The moon's dry central regions are covered in rippling dunes and arid deserts.
  • Steep walls of ice and rock rose from the softly rippling surface all around the ship.
  • And then the sooty yellow slowly turned a lush, rippling green.
  • She stretched, felt afloat in an ocean of blue light rippling around her body, and relaxed.
  • And it's globalization you can touch and walk around, a giant city where change is pouring in and rippling out around the globe.
  • But there are plenty of rippling abs and lots of stylized, gory gladiator action.
British Dictionary definitions for rippling

ripple1

/ˈrɪpəl/
noun
1.
a slight wave or undulation on the surface of water
2.
a small wave or undulation in fabric, hair, etc
3.
a sound reminiscent of water flowing quietly in ripples a ripple of laughter
4.
(electronics) an oscillation of small amplitude superimposed on a steady value
5.
(US & Canadian) another word for riffle (sense 4)
6.
another word for ripple mark
verb
7.
(intransitive) to form ripples or flow with a rippling or undulating motion
8.
(transitive) to stir up (water) so as to form ripples
9.
(transitive) to make ripple marks
10.
(intransitive) (of sounds) to rise and fall gently her laughter rippled through the air
Derived Forms
rippler, noun
rippling, adjective
ripplingly, adverb
ripply, adjective
Word Origin
C17: perhaps from rip1

ripple2

/ˈrɪpəl/
noun
1.
a special kind of comb designed to separate the seed from the stalks in flax, hemp, or broomcorn
verb
2.
(transitive) to comb with this tool
Derived Forms
rippler, noun
Word Origin
C14: of Germanic origin; compare Middle Dutch repelen, Middle High German reffen to ripple
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rippling

ripple

v.

early 15c., "to crease;" 1660s, "to present a ruffled surface," of unknown origin, perhaps a frequentative of rip (v.). Transitive sense "cause to ripple" is from 1786. Related: Rippled; rippling.

n.

"very small wave," 1798, from earlier meaning "stretch of shallow, rippling water" (1755), from ripple (v.). Meaning "mark or movement suggestive of a ripple" is from 1843. Meaning "ice cream streaked with colored syrup" first attested 1939, so called from its appearance. As the name of a brand of inexpensive wine sold by E&J Gallo Winery, from 1960 to 1984. Ripple effect is from 1950.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for rippling

ripple

noun

A try; an attempt; crack, rip, shot: I'll never figure out how these pieces fit, so why don't you have a ripple?

Related Terms

give something a shot, have a crack at something

[origin uncertain; perhaps fr rip in the sense of a strong action, attempt, or blow; perhaps fr 1800s make a riffle or ripple, ''to succeed, make it,'' based on crossing or getting through dangerous rapids in a river]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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